Baleron (Polish Smoked Pork Shoulder)

story28
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Post by story28 » Mon Apr 23, 2012 11:53

I wanted to share what I received back from Waldemar. This looks like an interesting recipe and despite it's brevity in procedure, I think it covers all the necessary steps.


Pork but-Pork shoulder - 5.0 kg
Salt - 0.180 kg
Third Ammonium - 0.007 kg
4th Pepper - 0.01 kg
5th Allspice - 0.01 kg
6th Artificial casing or film of lard.

Rub meat with salt, saltpetre and spices in a mortar utłuczonymi.
Put into a container (preferably stone), cover plate, charge. Let stand for 15 days in a cool place, every day pour the meat produced brine. Remove, dry 3-4 hours, wear sheath or membrane of the fat, osznurować.
4 hours to smoke a warm smoke.
Allow to cool to a temperature lower than 18 degrees Celsius.
Średniotrwały product.

Authors: Wojciech Tadeusz Barowicz and Tatarczuch
Contributed by: Maxell
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Post by IdaKraut » Tue Apr 24, 2012 22:12

I truly hope a better translation is forthcoming. Using ammonium is not appetizing to me. Let's hope one of our Polish members will give a good translation.
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Post by redzed » Tue Apr 24, 2012 23:36

I don't think this recipe is of much help to most of us. I'd like to see the entire Polish version but it looks like an old home recipe from a time where there was a shortage of proper curing ingredients and lack of appropriate storage. Whether they are talking here about ammonium nitrate or ammonium hydroxide (of the recent McDonalds pink slime fame), I'd rather use that stuff on my windows than to kill bacteria on my meat.
To assist in the translation, the spices are to be crushed with a mortar and pestle, the reference to lard is probably meant to refer to a layer of fat and "osznurować is to tie with string. Średniotrwały product means that it can be kept in a fridge for up to a month.

My ancestors probably made a variation of this primitive wędzonka and consumed it with gusto after a shot or two of potato vodka, but I don't think I will be making it anytime soon.
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Post by Baconologist » Tue Apr 24, 2012 23:59

Saltpeter was translated to ammonium, but of course Cure#1, in the correct amount, is the appropriate cure as far as those in the US and Canada are concerned.

Here's the original:

Baleron Wędzony

1. Karkówka wieprzowa - 5,0 kg
2. Sól - 0,180 kg
3. Saletra - 0,007 kg
4. Pieprz - 0,01 kg
5. Ziele angielskie - 0,01 kg
6. Osłonka sztuczna lub błona z sadła.

Mięso natrzeć solą, saletrą i przyprawami utłuczonymi w moździerzu.
Włożyć do naczynia (najlepiej kamiennego), przykryć talerzykiem, obciążyć. Odstawić na 15 dni w chłodne miejsce, codziennie polewać mięso wytworzona solanką. Wyjąć, suszyć 3-4 godziny, założyć osłonkę lub błonę z sadła, osznurować.
Wędzić 4 godziny ciepłym dymem.
Ostudzić do temp. niższej niż 18 stopni C..
Produkt średniotrwały.

Autorzy: Tadeusz Barowicz i Wojciech Tatarczuch
Nadesłał: Maxell


There are more baleron recipes on the Polish site:
http://wedlinydomowe.pl/wedzonki/balerony



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Post by redzed » Wed Apr 25, 2012 01:58

1. Pork butt - 5 kg
2. Salt - 180g
3. Saltpeter .007 kg
4. Pepper - .01 kg
5. Allspice - .01 kg
6. Artificial casing or caul fat membrane

Rub meat with the salt, saltpeter and mortar crushed spices.
Place in a container (preferably stoneware), cover with a plate and press with weight. Set aside in a cool place, moistening it daily with the resulting brine. Remove, dry 3-4 hours, stuff into casing or caul fat and lace with string.
Apply warm smoke for 4 hours.
Cool to a temperature below 18 c.
Mid-range storage storage life (I believe up to 30 days in a fridge)
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Post by Baconologist » Wed Apr 25, 2012 02:18

Thanks redzed!
I appreciate you taking the time to do the translation!






Bob
Godspeed!

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Post by redzed » Wed Apr 25, 2012 03:16

Oops, forgot about the part that the meat should be cured for 15 days.
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Post by redzed » Sun Jan 07, 2018 20:29

Here's my Baleron (a.k.a. Cottage Ham or Cottage Roll)

Pork shoulder coppa cut, dry cured for 12 days with 2.2% sea salt, .2% #1, coarsely ground BP and Bay leaf. Rinsed off, stuffed into beef bung, netted allowed dry at room temp for 3 hours, smoked with cherry and alder for 4 hours at 57-60C (135-140F). Finished by poaching in 70C (167F) water until IT of 64C (148F). Tender, juicy and absolutely delicious. Can be eaten warm, cold or fried like bacon. Fantastic in sandwich, and don't trim off the fat! :grin: As far as flavour and mouthfeel, it blows a smoked pork loin out of the water!

Image

Image
Last edited by redzed on Mon Jan 08, 2018 09:03, edited 1 time in total.
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Post by Laftpig » Sun Jan 07, 2018 23:15

Impressive ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

Can`t wait until I can accomplish something like this.
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Post by redzed » Mon Jan 08, 2018 07:52

Laftpig wrote:Impressive ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

Can`t wait until I can accomplish something like this.
Thanks, but it's really a very easy product to prepare, and using equilibrium curing and finishing by poaching it's almost fool proof. Go buy a pork butt or two, cut out the coppa for the baleron and make sausage with the rest. :grin:
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Post by jens49 » Mon Jan 08, 2018 08:51

Looking good but why the # 2?
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Post by redzed » Mon Jan 08, 2018 09:02

Good point. It should have #1 for a product such as this. I should not have written down #2, but I did because that's what I had in my notes and what I actually used. The reason was that it started off as a coppa which was meant to be dried for a couple of months, but I changed my mind and made a Baleron. Will correct the recipe so not to confuse others in the future.
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Post by muxmun » Wed Jan 10, 2018 23:04

Red. Thanks. I would really like to give this a go but a few questions as I am still quite the novice.

1. The salt and cure #1 are percentage of the total weight?
2. You said equilibrium curing. Should these cures be mixed with water?
3. Can a collagen casing be used in stead of a beef bung? size?
4. What size is the netting and is it necessary ?
5. When you poached it I assume a Sous Vide. Poached as is or in a bag?

OK, so more than a few questions. :grin:

Your pictures are great and have inspired me to make that with all the help I can get.

Thanks Red
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Post by redzed » Fri Jan 12, 2018 17:41

1. The salt and cure #1 are percentage of the total weight? Yes
2. You said equilibrium curing. Should these cures be mixed with water? No, just mix the salt, cure and spices and rub into the meat. But if you want, you can make a slurry with a bit of wine and smear that into the meat.
3. Can a collagen casing be used in stead of a beef bung? size? This recipe is for the classic baleron which is in a beef bung. It affects the texture and imparts flavour. Natural casings will also conform better with the shate of the coppa cut. But if you are able to stuff it into a collagen casing, it would be fine. Size would depend on the size of the cut, anywhere from 75 to 120mm.
4. What size is the netting and is it necessary? I don't know the size of my netting. Bought a big roll a while ago. Not necessary, and the classic way is to tie it. Netting is easy to use, it helps shape the product, forces out air pockets and helps with adhering the casing to the meat.
5. When you poached it I assume a Sous Vide. Poached as is or in a bag? Nothing above about sous vide cooking, but I did use a sous vide heater/circulator. :lol: I poached the baleron at 167F until an IT of 148. No bag, just the water. I preheated the water to 180 on the stove, then took it off, dropped the baleron in and attached my sous vide circulator to maintain the temp at 167.

Good luck and let us know how things turn out
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Post by Kijek » Fri Jan 12, 2018 18:56

RED, that is a beautiful and tasty looking Baleron, and oh man would I just love to try some, I love hams.
I now have to try and make that myself for sure.

Question:
You said you used sea salt, I was never sure about using sea salt or the himalayan pink sea salt.
Are these salts acceptable to use in cures?
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