Scrapple recipe

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redzed
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Post by redzed » Thu Jan 24, 2013 06:52

Bob, I completely understand that as an American you are not subject to any old world traditions, but in your original post you implied that as far as scrapple goes, anything goes. And further to that, you stated that the same applies to head cheese, and that is where I disagree. And did you not a little while ago object to someone referring to a Genoa style salami as Salami Allessandra? Why should that matter in America?

And I don't have a favourite scrapple recipe. Have eaten many Mennonite dishes and knew many Mennonite farmers while growing up in Saskatchewan and working at my father's abbatoir, but have never tried scrapple. It's not on my bucket list of things to do, but would gladly eat it if presented with the opportunity.

Best wishes,

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Re: Scrapple recipe

Post by Baconologist » Thu Jan 24, 2013 06:53

CrankyBuzzard wrote:hasn't found any that meets her criteria
Has she been specific about her criteria?
If we know more about exactly what she's looking for, we can more closely match with an acceptable recipe.
Godspeed!

Bob
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Post by Baconologist » Thu Jan 24, 2013 07:14

redzed wrote:Bob, I completely understand that as an American you are not subject to any old world traditions, but in your original post you implied that as far as scrapple goes, anything goes. And further to that, you stated that the same applies to head cheese, and that is where I disagree. And did you not a little while ago object to someone referring to a Genoa style salami as Salami Allessandra? Why should that matter in America?

And I don't have a favourite scrapple recipe. Have eaten many Mennonite dishes and knew many Mennonite farmers while growing up in Saskatchewan and working at my father's abbatoir, but have never tried scrapple. It's not on my bucket list of things to do, but would gladly eat it if presented with the opportunity.

Best wishes,

Redzed
I didn't say or imply that anything goes when it comes to scrapple. Scroll back and reread the post.
I said that all scrapple has a few things in common, most importantly pork scraps and offal that are thickened with cornmeal or buckwheat. It's also often seasoned with at least sage. Salt and pepper goes without saying. That's not anything goes.
Beyond that, ingredients can vary.

There is no such thing as American scrapple or headcheese in Europe.
There are things that are similar, but not the same.

American (Especially PA Dutch) headcheese isn't European headcheese.

Same with the Salami Alessandra, there's no such thing in Europe, but there are things that are similar.

Salami Alessandra isn't Genoa Bologna.

Confusing the issue isn't going to serve anyone well.

The topic of discussion is Scrapple of the North East USA.

Again, I was speaking of New World American scrapple and headcheese, well known among the Pennsylvania Germans, not headcheese in general and certainly not European headcheese.

The homemade American headcheese that I know from first hand experience can vary from cook to cook, just like scrapple, just like meatloaf.

That's the way it is.

Hog Maw is another example of something along the same line.

Great stuff, by the way!!!
Godspeed!

Bob
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Post by Baconologist » Thu Jan 24, 2013 08:30

Here's an old basic recipe.
I have many many more.

Molly Stoltzfus' Scrapple

Pork liver, kidneys, heart and scraps.
Cornmeal or other good meal.
Salt and freshly ground black pepper.
Sage or thyme (optional.)

Clean the livers and kidneys. Add the heart and cook in salted water until just tender. Remove from pot, chop and combine with pork scraps. Return to pot and continue cooking until very tender. The start sprinkling meal into the pot, stirring it thoroughly all the time until it takes on the consistency of cornmeal mush and bubbles and pops. (Be careful, for sometimes the bubbles burst and spew you with boiling-hot meal.) Season well with salt and pepper and, if you like, sage or thyme. Pour immediately into pans or molds and allow to cool.
Godspeed!

Bob
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Post by Doug » Sun Feb 10, 2013 20:57

ssorllih

Where are those recipes that you have listed in your post?

Thanks - Doug
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Post by ssorllih » Sun Feb 10, 2013 22:53

Doug, Those are just the ingredient lists from the package labels of commercial scrapple.
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Post by Smokin Don » Mon Feb 11, 2013 08:41

A quote from Redzed "Smoking Don posted a link to a blog where something is called "scrapple" but if you look at the recipe you might as well serve refried beans to your guests and tell them that it's salmon mousse."

Redzed you seem to be very good at putting down something you never tried. I said this was a modern ver. of scrapple. If every household had their own recipe for making scrapple who knows if this is not really an old recipe that the family called scrapple! Don

I just reread her recipe and read the definition of scrapple at Wiki. I would say her recipe qualifies to be called scrapple!
I am not aging, just marinating!
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Post by redzed » Mon Feb 11, 2013 19:26

Don, I have no problem with your interpretation of scrapple. However, I stand by my my initial statement. Making a meat loaf out of smoked sausage and ground pork shoulder does not resemble any scrapple recipe that I have ever seen. Nowhere did I criticize the end product. I'm sure sure it's tasty and satisfying. But at the same time, if I make tomato soup, I don't insist on calling it mushroom soup.
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Post by ssorllih » Mon Feb 11, 2013 20:41

There is some very unnecessary elitism creeping into this thread concerning what can best be described as regional names and terms for processed foods. Before this slides into name calling it will probably be best if we agree that almost any concoction of meat scraps and thickening can and probably is called scrapple by someone somewhere. I have lived on all three coasts of this continent and from personal experience I can say that their are as many ways to prepare food as there are cooks. Ask for baked beans in of the fifty states and you will get fifty different meals.
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Post by el Ducko » Mon Feb 11, 2013 23:10

...just "stirring the pot." When we first were moved to North Carolina, I accidentally bit into some fried livermush, thinking that it was Boston baked bread. It took another five years before I had the nerve to try another piece. And five years after that, I accidentally... :mrgreen:

For what it's worth, y'all: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Livermush
Livermush (From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

Livermush (sometimes called liver pudding) is a Southern United States food product composed of pig liver, head parts, and cornmeal. It is commonly spiced with pepper and sage.

Shelby, North Carolina hosts an annual Livermush Exposition, which began in 1987 to celebrate the unique delicacy. In that year the Cleveland County Commissioners and the Shelby City Council passed resolutions proclaiming that "livermush is the most delicious, most economical and most versatile of meats." Other towns in North Carolina that have livermush festivals include Drexel and Marion.

It is commonly cooked by cutting a slice off of a pre-made loaf and frying it with grease in a skillet until golden brown, similar to the way Spam is prepared. At breakfast it is served alongside grits and eggs. For lunch it can be made into a sandwich with mayonnaise or mustard, either fried as above, or left cold. As livermush's popularity has risen, it has appeared as an ingredient in dishes such as omelettes and pizzas.

See also
Scrapple http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scrapple
Experience - the ability to instantly recognize a mistake when you make it again.
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Post by redzed » Tue Feb 12, 2013 04:17

ssorllih wrote:There is some very unnecessary elitism creeping into this thread concerning what can best be described as regional names and terms for processed foods. Before this slides into name calling it will probably be best if we agree that almost any concoction of meat scraps and thickening can and probably is called scrapple by someone somewhere. I have lived on all three coasts of this continent and from personal experience I can say that their are as many ways to prepare food as there are cooks. Ask for baked beans in of the fifty states and you will get fifty different meals.
Geez Ross, why the heck do we have to "agree" on everything? And as long as there is nothing personal or demeaning about what other people perceive, why can't we disagree? Let's not be thin skinned about these things. There is nothing wrong with having a respectful debate and even a bit of fun, especially when the subject is as banal as scrapple. It would certainly be a boring world if we all agreed with each other, ate the same food, listened to the same music, dressed the same and were fans of the same sports team. And are we all supposed to like "livermush"?
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Post by ssorllih » Tue Feb 12, 2013 04:36

Well Red, I suppose that we can all disagee about the way people express their opinions about the name and catagorization of foods, I can see no reason that I should agree with your often narrow view of the way others have expressed their experience.
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