Deviled Turkey

Post Reply
IdaKraut
Passionate
Passionate
Posts: 262
Joined: Thu Mar 22, 2012 21:49
Location: No. Idaho

Deviled Turkey

Post by IdaKraut » Sun Mar 24, 2013 22:04

I had some frozen turkey left over from Christmas and inspired by the deviled ham thread decided to try making deviled turkey spread. I referenced Underwood's White Meat Chicken Spread to give me some insight on what spices to use. Here's what I came up with:

Turkey Spread

2 turkey legs and 2 turkey thighs with the skin on
enough water to cover the above (about 1.5 quarts)
2 tsp. ground sage
2 tsp. marjoram
3 tsp. thyme
2 tsp. rosemary leaves
1 tsp. ground nutmeg
1 tsp. ground black pepper
1 TBS cure #1 (18 gm)

Place above in stock pot and bring to boil. Lower to simmer and cook for about 4 hours until meat is easily removed from bones. Allow to cool overnight in refrigerator or cooler.

Next day, remove skin and meat from bones and place in mixing bowl. Add the following:

to 2.47 lb de-boned turkey meat with skin, cooked________1123g
Kosher salt_______________________1.5%_____________16.8g
Onion Powder________________________________________2 tsp
Garlic Powder________________________________________2 tsp
Ground black pepper__________________________________1.5 tsp
MSG_____________________________0.5%______________5.6g
Instant potato flakes__________________________________1/2 cup
Broth from cooking turkey, strained_______________________1/2 cup

De boned turkey meat with skin and spices, instant potatoes and broth:

Image

Working in batches, add above to food processor and process until desired consistency (about 45 seconds). Make sure meat is really, really cold:

Image

Spread on rye bread, really good, better than the Underwood product, IMHO (it spreads quite nicely, just like pate):

Image

Now, how to store this? I will probably portion it out and place in zip lock bags and freeze. It would be nice to can this stuff just like the overpriced commercial product, but I lack the experience in canning. Any experienced canners out there that could offer advice?

I think this recipe would work great with chicken when it's on sale.
Rudy
ssorllih
Veteran
Veteran
Posts: 4331
Joined: Sun Feb 27, 2011 19:32
Location: maryland

Post by ssorllih » Sun Mar 24, 2013 22:30

Rudy, I can liver pate aka chopped liver in quarter pints and have canned chopped ham in half pints in the pressure canner using the same time table as for pints (75 minutes) The process pressure varies with your elevation. I just got a jar out for this evening but there is no date on but it is the one of the last three in a batch of a couple of dozen that I did a couple of years ago. You can pack it into the jar pretty tight and leave a one inch headspace. When I pack the jars cold I put them into a cold canner and heat everything together. Vent the canner for ten minutes after it starts blowing steam and close the vent count time from when it reaches set pressure point.
Ross- tightwad home cook
ssorllih
Veteran
Veteran
Posts: 4331
Joined: Sun Feb 27, 2011 19:32
Location: maryland

Post by ssorllih » Sun Mar 24, 2013 23:00

Chopped liver just opened. I marred the surface with a finger touch. Image
Ross- tightwad home cook
IdaKraut
Passionate
Passionate
Posts: 262
Joined: Thu Mar 22, 2012 21:49
Location: No. Idaho

Post by IdaKraut » Mon Mar 25, 2013 15:52

Ross,
Many thanks for the detailed instructions.

Last time I tried canning (I tried Big Guy's Splam recipe) I had a disaster: the pint jars I put the Splam into all failed because either the lids blew off the jars or the jars broke while in the pressure cooker. Not a single jar was usable. Maybe I should use the smaller jars?
Rudy
ssorllih
Veteran
Veteran
Posts: 4331
Joined: Sun Feb 27, 2011 19:32
Location: maryland

Post by ssorllih » Mon Mar 25, 2013 16:45

Rudy use straight side jars. Be a fanatic about a full inch of head space. Make certain the the jar rim is clean, tighten the band on the lid only until you get finger tip tight resistance. the jar has to vent the air from the head space, as long as the gasket is in close contact with the jar rim it will pull down when it cools after processing. very often after the jars are cool the band will spin off with no resistance becuse the lid has pulled down on the gasket. When the time cycle is complete just turn off the fire and allow everthing to cool naturally. My old pressure cannerdidn't have a safety lock on the lid and I had to just jiggle the pressure weight to determine when the pressure was down to zero. The Jars will burst from internal pressure if you run cold water over a hot canner.
Ross- tightwad home cook
IdaKraut
Passionate
Passionate
Posts: 262
Joined: Thu Mar 22, 2012 21:49
Location: No. Idaho

Post by IdaKraut » Mon Mar 25, 2013 16:52

Ross,
Thanks again. I did two things wrong, I overfilled the jars and screwed the caps on too tightly. Plus I filled the jars with cold sausage and put them into hot tap water instead of cold water. I'll know better next time. Thanks for the great advice.
Rudy
ssorllih
Veteran
Veteran
Posts: 4331
Joined: Sun Feb 27, 2011 19:32
Location: maryland

Post by ssorllih » Mon Mar 25, 2013 17:16

Rudy the only fault with cold jars in hot water is that it is possible to get the canner up to making steam before the jars have gotten hot and you might be short on the true processing times.
Ross- tightwad home cook
Tom J
Beginner
Beginner
Posts: 21
Joined: Mon Jul 16, 2012 17:30
Location: El Paso, Texas

Post by Tom J » Mon Mar 25, 2013 17:49

Ross, great advise. I also want to add A note of advice about glass canning jars. If you plan on reusing the jar treat them with care, that is never use A metal utensil to remove product, pack your product or clean (wash). In doing so you might etch the glass. This is most important when jars are reused in pressure cookers.
Rudy good looking spread.

Tom J
ssorllih
Veteran
Veteran
Posts: 4331
Joined: Sun Feb 27, 2011 19:32
Location: maryland

Post by ssorllih » Mon Mar 25, 2013 18:22

In forty years of canning and using my canned food I have never had occassion to scratch a jar with a steel table spoon. And or course you reuse the jars they cost 75 cents each and the dome lids are less that 20 cents. Some of my jars maybe 60 years old having been given them by women who canned their entire adult lives. If you keep in mind that they are glass and that they can break and chip everything will be fine.
Ross- tightwad home cook
adlena
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 1
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2013 05:49
Location: london

Post by adlena » Thu Jul 25, 2013 07:01

its so yummy, thanks for sharing
Post Reply