Ross's Maryland Bakery

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sawhorseray
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Post by sawhorseray » Wed May 22, 2013 06:34

Chicken, onion, shrooms, asparagus, pepperjack, eggs, Ross' famous baked goods! This sounds so good I'm just going to go eat something, tho I know it won't be anywhere near the quality of this. Dammit! RAY
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Post by Thewitt » Wed May 22, 2013 08:20

Made my first batch of Portuguese Sweet Bread as sausage rolls. Very nice. I'll share the recipe very soon.

-t
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Post by Bubba » Wed May 22, 2013 17:29

ssorllih wrote:This also works well with fish or pork.
With all the Chicken, onion, mushrooms, asparagus and pepperjack ingredients then baked by Ross it would have been a divine eating experience!
Ron
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Post by Chuckwagon » Wed May 22, 2013 19:52

Ross, if you were going to make an ideal bread for sandwiches made of thinly-sliced Canadian Bacon with just a touch of mustard and mayo, which bread recipe would you go for? I once added just a bit more sugar to the recipe and the bread was delicious. I even tried an egg in it. Any suggestions?

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Post by ssorllih » Wed May 22, 2013 20:25

My favorite dinner roll recipe uses white unbleached all purpose flour. Call any amount of flour 100% Add liquid consisting of one egg one cup of milk and water to make one pint. Or 16 ounces. The liquid will be 67% of the weight of the flour add 1.5% salt and 2% sugar and a tablespoonful of dry yeast. Dissolve the yeast in the liquid and add that to all of the flour,salt,sugar mix along with about 2% melted fat. Stir it to completely moisten the flour and cover it to allow the flour to hydrate. After twenty minutes (about) uncover the dough and knead it lightly for a couple of minutes this completes the mixing. Cover it for an hour or two as it rises. OR put it in the fridge over night. It will rise in the cold and be much easier to shape when it is cold . But after a couple of hours it will be ready to shape and get is final rise for baking. It has a good oven spring.
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Ross Hill`s Favorite Dinner Roll Recipe
(edited by CW)

1. Use white, unbleached, all purpose flour. Call any amount of flour 100% .
2. Add liquid consisting of one egg one cup of milk and water to make one pint. Or 16 ounces.
3. The liquid will be 67% of the weight of the flour add 1.5% salt and 2% sugar and a tablespoonful of dry yeast.
4. Dissolve the yeast in the liquid and add that to all of the flour,salt,sugar mix along with about 2% melted fat.
5. Stir it to completely moisten the flour and cover it to allow the flour to hydrate.
6. After twenty minutes (about) uncover the dough and knead it lightly for a couple of minutes this completes the mixing.
7. Cover it for an hour or two as it rises.... OR put it in the fridge overnight. It will rise in the cold and be much easier to shape when it is cold. After a couple of hours it will be ready to shape and get is final rise for baking. It has a good oven spring.
Last edited by ssorllih on Sat Jul 06, 2013 00:09, edited 1 time in total.
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Post by sawhorseray » Thu May 23, 2013 02:25

ssorllih wrote:My favorite dinner roll recipe uses white unbleached all purpose flour. Call any amount of flour 100% Add liquid consisting of one egg one cup of milk and water to make one pint. Or 16 ounces. The liquid will be 67% of the weight of the flour add 1.5% salt and 2% sugar and a tablespoonful of dry yeast. Dissolve the yeast in the liquid and add that to all of the flour,salt,sugar mix along with about 2% melted fat. Stir it to completely moisten the flour and cover it to allow the flour to hydrate. After twenty minutes (about) uncover the dough and knead it lightly for a couple of minutes this completes the mixing. Cover it for an hour or two as it rises. OR put it in the fridge over night. It will rise in the cold and be much easier to shape when it is cold . But after a couple of hours it will be ready to shape and get is final rise for baking. It has a good oven spring.
Am I figuring this right Ross?

67% liquid would add up to 3 cups of flour = 48tbsp
1.5% salt would equal .72 tbsp
2 % sugar would equal .96 tbsp, same for the melted fat (butter?)

I'd like to try this recipe but I'm not sure I'm in the right ballpark, or even the right planet. RAY
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Post by ssorllih » Thu May 23, 2013 03:02

A pint(16 ounce) would be enough liquid for 24 ounces of flour by weight or about 5½ cups
So lets start out with a pound and a half of flour. 67% of that will be about 16 ounces for the liquid. 2% of the 24 ounces is about a half ounce or one tablespoon. The tablespoon of yeast is enough for any size batch under five pounds. This will make about two and a half pounds of dough. If you allow about 3 ounces per burger bun it will yield a bit more than a dozen. Eggs come in fixed sizes so we use some flexibility in the egg count. If you like a light whole wheat bun substitute about one part whole wheat flour for the white flour to have 4 parts white and one part whole wheat.
try to avoid measuring flour by cups it is terribly unreliable, weighing is your best method.
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Post by sawhorseray » Thu May 23, 2013 05:07

Where's the breakdown? I am too stupid to want to figure how ALL THIS CRAP COMES TO BE. I need to deal in tsp. tbsp. cups, and everything else that requires a bit of brain-work to gert sorted out. Wife says I'm way too crabby, anniversary in Reno coming up and booked RAY
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Post by Chuckwagon » Thu May 23, 2013 07:17

try to avoid measuring flour by cups it is terribly unreliable, weighing is your best method.
Verrrry interesting. The whole process is fascinating. Thanks pal. :smile:
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Post by ssorllih » Thu May 23, 2013 13:35

Ray, the problem with flour is that you can compact it in the measuring cup. If you sift it into the cup and strike off the excess you will have a bit under 4½ ounces probably closer to 4 ounces . if you set the cup down hard a couple of times the flour will settle and the cup will no longer be full. If you scoop the flour from the bag with the cup and strike it level you will have about 5 ounces of flour. The net result is for 6 cups of flour you could have 24 ounces to 30 ounces. That would mean that your pint of liquid could be 67% or 53% moisture in the dough. The former is a dough that is easy to handle and the latter is a very stiff difficult dough. The same follows with kneading the dough. If you add too much flour as you knead you change the recipe.
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Post by ssorllih » Thu May 23, 2013 14:32

This is a cup of flour scooped from the bag dumped on the tray and weighed = 6 ounces
then I used a spoon and refilled the cup from the pile of flour. The weight of the flour left on the tray =2 ounces. Image
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Post by sawhorseray » Thu May 23, 2013 16:17

Thanks Ross, I have a clear understanding now, your explanation was perfect. What I don't have is the proper scale for the job. My meat scale goes from zero to 150 pounds and weighs to the tenth of a pound, reloading scale is too small but could come in handy for weighing salt, sugar, and the like. I'll come up with something soon.

Got a call from my buddy in Paso Robles that the hogs are in the barley fields, we let them fatten up until June 12 when a couple are due to die hard. Off to the range today to ensure the Weatherby is still properly tuned, no more then 3-4 shots, not that much fun to shoot when nothing is going to die. Off to Reno tomorrow morning for anniversary weekend dining and gaming. Maybe I'll have a drink. RAY
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Post by ssorllih » Thu May 23, 2013 18:46

I use a Pittney-Bowles postage scale only goes to 4 pounds but by half ounces.
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Post by sawhorseray » Fri May 24, 2013 00:19

Got home from the range and my wife had gone to Kohls and picked up a Food Network kitchen scale that weighs in 1/8 ounces, digital, up to eleven pounds. Got a new can opener too!

Perfect at the range, three shots within a fifty cent piece at 100 yards, good to go. Will pick up more "condor friendly" bullets at the Cabelas in Reno tomorrow, seem to have only five left. Two boxes should be a lifetime supply, especially at $75 for a box of 20 bullets, then add on the tax. Ridiculous. RAY
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Post by sawhorseray » Thu May 30, 2013 08:19

I'm kind of ready to get on with this in the morning Ross, your explanations have been clear and I've got everything printed out to help me along. Two questions:

1 : Oven temp
2 : How long

I imagine there will be some trial and error, this sounds like a fun project. Thanks in advance for your help. RAY
“Good judgment comes from experience, and a lotta that comes from bad judgment.”
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