Buying A Mechanically Tenderized Sub-Primal Cut

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Buying A Mechanically Tenderized Sub-Primal Cut

Post by Shuswap » Sat Sep 27, 2014 15:35

At Costco we were debating over buying a whole sirloin tip or a whole top sirloin. By coincidence the lady standing next to us mentioned that we should buy the top sirloin and have the butcher mechanically tenderize it for us (no charge), which we did. I didn`t know that service was available. I was able to watch the tenderizing process and how the machine was used.

At home I watched YouTube videos on cutting the top sirloin into steaks and roasts and went to work. Last night we had our first bbq`d top sirloin steaks marinated with Montreal steak seasoning - fantastic!

But I was curious about the tenderizing process and here is what I found - in Canada any mechanically tenderized meat is to be cooked to an IT of 160F because of the increased risk of this process. This temperature is at medium or just above.

Here is my source, which has a lot more useful information including transporting meat, which I do all the time.

http://www.bccdc.ca/foodhealth/meat/default.htm
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Post by Butterbean » Sat Sep 27, 2014 16:31

Yeah, the tenderizing can turn the whole meat product into something that has to be treated like hamburger or mince. Consider pickling eggs and the importance that your eggs are not damaged and have no cracks in the yolks. These cracks allow pathogens - botulism for one - to enter the egg and even though there is ample vinegar and salt they can still be lethal.

Whole meat cuts are just that. Whole and not holey. But cooking it as soon as you did you shouldn't have any problem but you should keep this in mind if you were making something like bresaola or something you will be aging or smoking for any length of time.
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Post by Shuswap » Sat Sep 27, 2014 19:07

Butterbean, thanks for your comments. We have a jar of my daughters pickled eggs in the fridge for as long as I limit my intake :wink: When you talk about cracks in "yolks" I assume you meant shells. We used to be an egg producer selling at the farm gate but never sold cracks. We have a restaurant in town that cooks with cracks - we don't eat there. The top sirloin will not be used for any kind of sausage or cured meats. It was cut, vac sealed and in the freezer within 18 hours of purchase.

You can probably tell that CW has gotten through to me about safety in this tasty hobby. I believe you are commercial and I appreciate your sharing your knowledge and experience with us beginners. Thanks.
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Post by Butterbean » Sat Sep 27, 2014 19:59

I'm referring to the cooked white itself. Least that is how I understand it. Its a rare thing but the crack in the cooked white can allow an entry point for a pathogen to get deep within the egg where the pickle will not penetrate. The pH in this area is ideal for pathogen growth and the pickle will rarely reach this area so it can be a problem.

You should always cull eggs that don't peel clean.

National center for food preservation says:
All peeled eggs used should be free of nicks, cuts, holes or punctures
As said, this is one of those rare things but it does happen and has been the cause of botulism in pickled eggs. I think the principle is the same with whole meats so while the risk is very small I think its worth knowing and recognizing there is a risk so given a choice its best not to do it.

Not trying to fear monger or split hairs. Just worth knowing I think.

On stuff like this I always think of how tetanus works. Puncture wound, no air.
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Post by Shuswap » Sat Sep 27, 2014 20:01

Butterbean wrote:Not trying to fear monger or split hairs. Just worth knowing I think.
Which is why I have passed this thread on to DW and our daughter
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Post by Butterbean » Sat Sep 27, 2014 21:08

Speaking of pickled eggs. I love them and have a funny tale about them. Some years ago, before the advent of the digital camera, I pickled several quarts of pickled eggs. I called them Dragon's Eggs because they were so hot. The perfect snack to have with a beer. Several actually because one bite would require at least ten ounces of cold suds to quench the fire. Anyhow, I made a bunch of these then ended up moving to a new house. Some of these eggs got misplaced during the move and one day - about eight years later - I found the stash of eggs.

I wish I would have had a digital camera to have taken a picture of these eggs but they in no way resembled the eggs I placed in the quart jars eight years earlier. No, they looked more like chocolate Easter eggs. I studied them for several hours trying to determine what dangers these might present to mankind but knew my process was sound and could find none. But what to do with them? They looked intimidating. Almost deadly. In no way did they have the look of friendliness or wholesomeness but then I thought of how aging whiskey only makes it better and who better to know the beauty of aging whiskey than my friend Travis so I called him and explained the situation.

As if he read my mind, we met up with our fishing rods and a cooler of beer and two quarts of these eggs and went fishing. (We thought it best we do this away from civilization) I was the brave one and took the first bite. The egg was chocolate colored clear through to the yolk and it was anything but yellow. More like a molten lava rouge. When the bite of the egg touched my mouth my senses went haywire. Fire, spices, vinegar shot through my body. Beautiful! We ate both jars and had to run to the store again for more coolant. The next day we both stayed clear of crowded populated areas out of respect for the environment and air quality.
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Post by Shuswap » Sun Sep 28, 2014 00:27

Butterbean wrote:I studied them for several hours trying to determine what dangers these might present to mankind
Our favorite chemical engineer would have saved you a lot of time by cracking open a bottle and testing the fire with one quick bite. You are braver than me. I worry about a best before date that expired last week. :grin:
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Post by Butterbean » Sun Sep 28, 2014 01:01

I would hope your chemical engineer wouldn't be in a cramped lab the day after ingestion less the draft fans were on full blast. :mrgreen:

If there is such a thing as brutally delicious these would have been it.

These are some Dragon's Eggs only they haven't been allowed to age the required 8 years.

Image

Am now thinking of what would happen if I used some Carolina Reapers in this brine. :cool:
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