Garlic Mayonnaise

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Thewitt
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Garlic Mayonnaise

Post by Thewitt » Wed Oct 30, 2013 12:45

I'm going to be helping a friend with a startup sandwich shop, and he wants to make his own mayonnaise.

I've shown him a simple recipe and made mayo - using pasteurized eggs, oil, salt and lemon juice.

Before we start going to flavored mayo, I was looking for any experiences you guys might wish to share.

He plans on a garlic mayonnaise and a curry mayonnaise to start with...I think I'll switch to vinegar instead of lemon juice in the curry mayo, but garlic and lemon go well in the garlic one.

Comments?
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el Ducko
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Post by el Ducko » Wed Oct 30, 2013 15:51

People the world over seem to love mayonnaise on all sorts of things. It's amazing! Yet there seem to be major variations on what their local version of mayonnaise actually is.

Here in Texas, surprisingly, people still favor a concoction called "Miracle Whip," which is less susceptible to spoiling under conditions of poor refrigeration. (I suspect that there is a secondary market, adhesives, but we won't go there!) Something (hopefully edible) is substituted for most, if not all, of the egg yolks. :razz:

Our German friends like curry mayonnaise, something which is nearly unknown here. That's probably a flavor preference, rather than a storage problem, although the spicing may have been a storage issue long ago. Food preservation is said to be one of the origins of heavy spice usage in India.

Our Greek friends favor tzatziki sauce, which is yogurt based. They use it in preference to mayonnaise. Again, maybe refrigeration is or was an issue.

We've known quite a few people from Belarus, Ukraine, and Moldova through our Sister Cities exchange programs. All were crazy about mayonnaise. I suspect that powdered eggs are used in their mayonnaise, but am not sure.

Sorry for the rambling thoughts. Whatever is the preference there in Penang would probably be best. If your friend strays too far from local preference, his customers won't like it.

He can't go wrong with garlic!
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Thewitt
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Post by Thewitt » Wed Oct 30, 2013 18:04

I love rambling on topic, so no need to apologize.

At the investors meeting we served the garlic mayonnaise and it was a big hit. One of them wants to actually bottle it....though I'm not sure if I want to go down that path. It's one thing to make a fresh mayo you will use within a week or throw out, quite another to bottle a product that will sit in a grocery store for a year before being opened!
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Post by Chuckwagon » Thu Oct 31, 2013 04:39

Hi Witt, you asked for our thoughts... so here are a few of mine. Many cooks claim that crushed garlic added directly to food has too much of a "raw edge" and they recommend toasting it to make it less bitter. On the trail, I just toss several unpeeled cloves of garlic inside a dry, cast iron skillet over medium heat to tame the harsh flavor a bit. Shake the pan regularly until the skins are golden brown in about five minutes. The skins will almost fall off the cooked morsels. If you prefer creamier texture, increase the cooking time to as much as fifteen minutes. If you are at home with an oven, you may prefer to bake them. Quite a number of good panjanglers toast the stuff in a little olive oil and then add the oil to foods along with the garlic. In any event, be careful not to burn it as it becomes bitter. The amount of flavor extracted from garlic depends upon the extent to which a clove is cut or crushed as the cells of the plant are ruptured releasing allyl sulfenic acid - an odorless chemical - combining with the enzyme allinase. The compound created is known as allicin - the stuff directly accountable for the fundamental aroma and flavor of garlic. The more the plant is broken down, the more enzymes are released as its "bite" becomes stronger. Cooks should realize that allinase becomes inert whenever heated beyond 150 degrees F. and no new flavors may be rendered from the plant - a desired characteristic when it comes to the preparation of "baked garlic".

Good luck with your project. It sounds like a winner! :wink:

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Chuckwagon
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Thewitt
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Post by Thewitt » Thu Oct 31, 2013 05:17

Thanks CW

I did make both a raw garlic and roasted garlic mayonnaise for the investors party. Both were a hit. My personal favorite is the roasted one. I like the much more subtle flavor for sauces that will not be cooked.

The surprising favorite was a sauerkraut and yellow mustard relish made with our own kraut.

The unsurprising favorite was a sweet Thai style chili sauce.
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Post by sambal badjak » Thu Oct 31, 2013 12:13

That sounds like a succesfull bash!
I normally make lazy mayonnaisse (better known as stick blender mayonaisse. I always use fresh eggs.
My favourites are garlic mayonaisse and curry mayonaisse.
You can quite easily transform "normal" mayonaisse into a cocktail sauce as well. Great with seafood. In your case add some chili powder to it. Adding some sambal would be awesome as well!

Your pickle sounds intriguing. Care to share the recipe?
I still have some kraut waiting to be used....
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Thewitt
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Post by Thewitt » Thu Oct 31, 2013 13:35

Sauerkraut is very simple to make, and there is another thread on it here. It's really only cabbage and salt in a fermentation bucket...

My relish is made by simply adding yellow mustard to chopped up sauerkraut... I want to be able to add all the condiments to these sausage rolls via large squeeze bottles, so I had to come up with a way to prep the sauerkraut so it would dispense.
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Post by Chuckwagon » Fri Nov 01, 2013 01:14

Sambal, here`s a link for info about Stan`s book about sauerkraut: http://wedlinydomowe.pl/en/viewtopic.php?t=5672
Also, here`s a link for a recipe in our MRI (Member`s Recipe Index), by our buddy Uwanna in Vermont: http://wedlinydomowe.pl/en/viewtopic.php?t=5686

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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