(Poland) Flaki - honeycomb tripe in Polish dish

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StefanS
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(Poland) Flaki - honeycomb tripe in Polish dish

Post by StefanS » Wed Dec 14, 2016 04:51

Hi All. Christmas season is coming so during preparation I have found good deal on them ($2.99per Lb) - box of 10Lb. In Polish people it is one of more valued dishes, mostly prepared during a huge families gatherings. Also it one of few polish dishes that can be prepared in many similar ways like kielbasa - everyone cook has own recipe. Most people love them, many like them and some hate them.
So lets start - defrosting - 3 days in refrigerator.
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Then washing and boiling in water only. During boiling process I have changed water 3 times ( boiling for 30min. then draining, filling with new water, boiling30 min, draining, etc) it took me around 3 hours (when they become soft). Reason - less fat plus eliminating odor). During last boiling I have added some salt to water. During that time in other pots I have prepared a bullion - beef ox tail , cubed beef for stew, pork ham bones, pork neck bones, couple chicken things. I have added 1 part of bones and meat plus 3 parts of water, put it to boiling point, took out foam and let it simmer for 2 hours. Then I have added to bullion - salt, grind black pepper, few bay leaves, all spices, carrots, parsnip, celery knob, onion, leeks, red pepper, hot red pepper (little). ( I have been cheating and added 2 tablets (Maggi)of beef and 2 chicken). Then I have simmer it for additional 40 min.
During that process I have drained and let a tripe cool down. Then it is time to cut them in small strips like these on picture
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Also I have removed any bones, meat, vegies from bullion, separated meat from bones, cut veggies in small pieces. To hot bullion added tripes, meat, veggies. Heated it to boiling point and simmer it around 5 min. On end of cooking them I Have made a roux (not sure that is proper word) - but - some unsalted butter plus chopped onion putted in fry pan and heated it to point for glassy onion pieces, then added some wheat flour and keep it fry to browning onion and wheat. Add some bullion and mix it, then and that mixture to flaki. They looks like this
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At this time they have been ready to be served with some additional spices - marjoram and green sweet beans. They should be spicy hot.
Because I have made a lot of them so I do not finish them with roux, marjoram, beans yet.. Cooked hot flaki I have put to jars. Canned them in pressure canner for 30 min, (250*F). They should be good for next 3 months in refrigerator. Serving as soup (after heating them to boiling) with pieces of Italian or French bread.
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Last edited by StefanS on Wed Dec 14, 2016 13:36, edited 1 time in total.
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Bob K
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Post by Bob K » Wed Dec 14, 2016 13:51

Very nice Stefan! Something I have never tried.

Just curious on your canning time. If they were pressure canned at 10lb for 75 minutes (pints) or 90 minutes (quarts) they would not need to be refrigerated.
I am just inquiring not being critical.

P.S. I changed the duplicate cutting pic for the bowl pic. If that is not correct please let me know.
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StefanS
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Post by StefanS » Wed Dec 14, 2016 16:30

Bob K wrote:Just curious on your canning time. If they were pressure canned at 10lb for 75 minutes (pints) or 90 minutes (quarts) they would not need to be refrigerated.

I am just inquiring not being critical.
There are reasons that I have canned them for shorter time as suggested because :
- ingredients already cooked at near or 212F for few hours
- packed very hot to jars
- they will be used in approximately 2-3 months
- they will be kept in my storage room at temp. at this time a year at 40 to 55 F
- if I have canned them in normal timing then in jars I will have a honeycomb tripe pulp not soup.
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Post by Butterbean » Wed Dec 14, 2016 19:13

That looks interesting. Very resourceful. I like using things nose to tail so to speak.

I've been harvesting some deer lately and have been making a stock pile of venison broth to be used in lieu of water when making sausage or for bases in meals.

I'll take the bones and scraps and roast them in the oven being careful not to burn them. Once well roasted I dump the contents in a stock pot and gently simmer for hours then strain and can. I'll put some in the fridge but others I'll pressure can for 20 minutes at 10 lbs. These will keep indefinitely and insure a future supply of broth.

Roasted venison bones covered in water with vegetables and herbs added then simmered slowly for a day or two.

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Almost ready. Will be strained and canned once reduced to by 50-60%
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This is the chilled broth. Heat from canning messes with the proteins and "kills" the gel but the flavor is not harmed.

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redzed
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Post by redzed » Sat Dec 17, 2016 18:26

Stefan the tripe soup looks absolutely delicious and I sure would love to have some! Flaki is one of my favourite Polish dishes. Difficult to imagine that anything could be better than a big bowl of flaki, a couple of thick slices of fresh rye bread and a beer! My wife was introduced to it by my family and also loves the stuff. Why do you live on the other side of the continent? My mouth is watering as I look at the pics and now I have to make some soon. :grin:
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