Professional Charcutterie - The book

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Butterbean
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Professional Charcutterie - The book

Post by Butterbean » Mon Jan 26, 2015 01:05

Was given the Professional Charcuterie book for Christmas. Written by John Kinsella and David Harvey. Haven't done anything with it till this weekend. Some of the recipes looked interesting. I found one for a dry cured hard salami (page 124) I thought I'd try.

Began getting ingredients together and noticed the recipe called for using 5 grams of salt for 2.45 kg of meat which will be fermented. This isn't but 0.2%. With the addition of 14 g of Cure 2 this only bumps it to 0.7% total salt content which doesn't seem right.

The book seems to have some interesting stuff in it but after finding what looks to an error on the first recipe I considered I wonder about the quality of information in the rest of the book. Granted this could be a fluke or a misprint. Just wondering if anyone else has this book and an opinion of it.

Of course, I could be suffering from brain flatulence. Its been know to happen.
crustyo44
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salt content in recipe.

Post by crustyo44 » Mon Jan 26, 2015 06:13

Butterbean,
It most likely is a misprint. If it isn't, the author should have his arse kicked.
I think they forgot a zero after the 5, making it 50 grams.
I would follow the recipe but use the salt and cure #2 amount from the Marianski books.
An Australian printed Salami book I have, list from 25 to 30 grams of salt per kilo of meat
and amazingly they don't use any cure #2. Which I think is very unwise!!!!!!!!!
If you make these salamis as gifts, Do add Cure # 2 if you want to sleep at night!!!!!!!!!!!
Good luck Mate,
Jan.
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Post by Butterbean » Tue Jan 27, 2015 01:26

I found yet another two recipes which would lead to train wrecks if blindly followed.

Found a review by Ron at Hunter Angler and I have to say he is being very polite.
Not so much for the French book. I would only recommend "Professional Charcuterie" for a really serious charcutier, as I have never seen the book sell for less than $100. It is also geared toward pros, the English translation leaves a lot to be desired and the photos are laughably dated - 1982 called, and it wants its curly parsley garnishes back.
Really serious I think because you better know your math and be able to re-calculate some recipes. Also read where the author researched a three whole years before writing the book.

The book has some really good ideas as for whether the recipes are correct gives me pause.

Not going to bin it but will definitely read with caution because I just don't have much faith in the recipes.
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