Turkey, Smoken' & Choke by Chuckwagon

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Krakowska
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Turkey, Smoken' & Choke by Chuckwagon

Post by Krakowska » Tue Jul 01, 2014 01:09

SUPERB!! Just chowed down on my first Turkey, Smoken' Choke by Chuckwagon. I have never tasted anything like it. Did 2 turkey breasts and fellas, it does not taste like any turkey I ever had. Closer to a moist ham texture. Tip of the hat to Cw.
Thanks, Fred :cool:
Keep them safe until they all come home.
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Chuckwagon
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Post by Chuckwagon » Tue Jul 01, 2014 11:21

Thanks Fred. It really is quite different. People are always surprised by this recipe. It tastes best after being smoked of course, but is good right out of the brine and cooked in an oven also. I'm glad you enjoyed it. Make some more! :wink: Thank you for the kind words pal. I'm going to post the recipe again... right here - for the convenience of any other folks who would like to give it a try. Please do not substitute ingredients! It won't be the same.

Smoke n' Choke Turkey"
At first glance, it seems like a lot of Prague Powder Cure is being used in this recipe. Remember, it is used to treat three gallons, work its magic, and then it is poured straight down the drain - leaving an ideal 156 ppm. sodium nitrite.

Chuckwagon`s "Smoke n` Choke Turkey
(Delicious, Moist, Smoked Turkey)

2 gallons water
1 gallon 7-Up™ (soft drink) [Sprite may be used if 7-Up is not available.]
2-1/4 cups powdered dextrose
1-1/2 cups salt
1 cup Prague Powder #1

Use one of the two following pickling methods:

The "Cover Pickle Method" - Dissolve all the ingredients in water chilled at 38-40° F. (3°C.). Wash the cavity of the turkey very well and raise the temperature of the turkey to 38-40° F. (3°C.) before placing it into the brine. The turkey should be submerged in the brine for at least 4 days at 38-40° F. A larger turkey will take about 5 days to cure. After curing, place the turkey in ice-cold water for three hours.

OR

The "Spray-Pump Method" - Dissolve all the ingredients in water chilled to 38-40° F. (3°C.) Stitch pump the turkey with the curing solution using only 10% of the weight of the turkey. (If using a 20 lb. turkey, pump with 2 Lbs. of brine. A 15 lb. turkey requires 1-1/2 lbs. of brine, while a 10 lb. bird needs 1 lb. of brine). After pumping, place the turkey in ice-cold water for at least 3 hours. Remove the turkey from the water and place it into the remaining pickling solution at 38-40° F. (3°C.) inside a 38-40° F. (3°C.) cooler and allow it to cure 48 hours.

Smoking And Cooking The Turkey

After the turkey has been cured then soaked in cold, fresh, water, place it into a preheated smoker at 130° F. (54°C.). Cook the turkey at this temperature for at least 1 hour with the damper wide open to help remove moisture. Close the damper 3/4 shut (only 1/4 open) and apply a trickle of light smoke for 5 hours at 130° F. (54°C.). Hickory with apple is ideal. Avoid heavy smoke such as mesquite. Raise the temperature to 140° F. (60°C.) and hold the temperature 4 more hours, then cut off the smoke. Gradually, raise the smoke house temperature to 180° F. (82°C.) and maintain the temperature until the internal meat temperature reaches 160°F. (71°C.). Many folks prefer to finish baking the bird inside their home ovens following the initial smoking, serving it fully cooked. This is a moist and tasty option to the traditionally roasted Thanksgiving turkey... when not overcooked! Remember the "carry over effect" in which meat will continue to climb in temperature when removed from its cooking heat source. Removed from the oven when the meat temperature registers only a few degrees slightly above 160°F. (71°C.), turkey will generally continue to cook until it registers 170°F. (77°C.). Cooked further, the meat will be dry - most unprofessional! Use a dial meat thermometer, inserting the stem close to the ball-and-socket joint of the thigh, as this is the last place the meat becomes thoroughly cooked. Remove the turkey from the smoker and serve it hot with a meal or allow the internal temperature of the meat to drop to about 100°F. (38°C.) before placing it into the cooler for a day. Slice the cold meat thinly for sandwiches. Smoked turkey is a perishable product and should be kept refrigerated.

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
Last edited by Chuckwagon on Wed Jul 02, 2014 08:11, edited 1 time in total.
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by cogboy » Tue Jul 01, 2014 23:49

I will be trying that recipe !
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Post by sawhorseray » Wed Jul 02, 2014 05:56

Don't be afraid to try a smoker full of whole chickens using the same CW recipe. It's become a staple in our house and if you ever made chicken salad before, this stuff will change your life, it's absolutely the best ever. Even after being shrink-wrapped and frozen for six months my birds are delicious and juicy. All credit to CW, every time. RAY
“Good judgment comes from experience, and a lotta that comes from bad judgment.”
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Post by Chuckwagon » Wed Jul 02, 2014 07:38

I appreciate the kind words Ray. I'm glad you decided to try this recipe in the first place. I remember the first time you baptized a chicken too. :lol: I think you've got the recipe down to a fine science now!

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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