Online Workshop: Project B2 (October 2013)

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sawhorseray
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Post by sawhorseray » Tue Nov 12, 2013 18:02

I made a little wild hog Italian sausage yesterday and this morning.

14 lbs wild hog meat
8 lbs domestic porkbutt
Fennel seed 7tbsp
Corriander 2 tbsp.
Caraway 2 tbsp.
Anise 2 tbsp.
Red pepper 2 tbsp.
Black pepper 4 tbsp.
Salt 9 tbsp.
Sugar 2 tbsp.
Chopped garlic 20 large cloves
Zinfandel wine 1 750m bottle

The fennel, anise, coriander, and caraway were toasted on a metal pie pan in a 350° oven for five minutes, then gound along with the red pepper in a coffee grinder. All the dry ingredients and chopped garlic were then whisked into the cold bottle of Zinfandel for mixing.

The two stars of the show
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The meat was still pretty much frozen after three days in the fridge
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Being that cold it gound up nice in about two minutes
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22 pound loads fit perfectly into my mixer for a 3 minute ride
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I was up a four this morning after letting my stuffer tank spend the night in the freezer
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I decided to try the pricker trick I found on youtube last week.
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Didn't pop a single casing, the pricker trick is here to stay
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Everything shrink-wrapped, labeled, and cleaned up by 7:30
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Enough left in the bottom of the stuffer tank for a sausage and eggs brekky!. Maybe back to bed for awhile after that. RAY
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Post by Shuswap » Tue Nov 12, 2013 18:53

Ray, the links look great - I,m hoping that with more practice I can stuff the casing as uniformly. I've got the zinfandel but no wild hogs up here.
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Post by Chuckwagon » Tue Nov 12, 2013 20:24

Wow Ray, those ingredients spell Italian alright! Did you develop the recipe? How do you cook 'em? Keep up the good work - your links look terrific. Doesn't that just beat the snot out of the grocery store variety sausage? Just no comparison is there?

Ray ol' pard, I want to challenge you to do something. Make just three pounds of sausage with only salt, pepper, and ONE signature spice, herb, or substance. That one ingredient can be anything you can come up with. Think about it for a day then try something new. Perhaps a spice you've never tried before. Crushed herb? Chile? Cheese? Mushroom? Wine? Try something really original and see what happens.

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by sawhorseray » Wed Nov 13, 2013 00:31

Shuswap - check out the markings on my work board. Just line 'em, pinch 'em, and twist 'em.

CW - the recipe is actually yours, I just changed water into wine (no blasphemy intended) and added some anise, crushed red pepper, and garlic. Tastes great, what was left in the stuffer tank made breakfast with enough left over to add on top of a salami and Canadian bacon pizza tonight.

Three pounds??? My grinder weighs 58 pounds, hardly worth picking it up, much less cleaning it. I'll have to think on that one for a bit. Picked up 44 pounds of whole chickens and 18 pounds of whole pork loin today, gotta do some smokin' and get those tidy freezers filled back up! RAY
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Post by markjass » Wed Nov 13, 2013 08:38

I have no idea what wild pig tastes like. I would love to try some and am sure I would love it. As I am not a hunter I thought in my dreams I may try some. However, I have located a butcher that just supplies wild game meat up north. In December I am off on a long weekend comming back on the sunday. On the friday we will pass the butcher and hope to collect some pig + whatever he has got: Chamois, deer etc. I do not know the people we are staying with (old friends of my partner) I will see if they mind if I put some meat in their fridge/freezer.

In NZ it seams like the most common way people hunt pigs is with dogs. The dogs hold the pig down and then the hunter slits the pigs throat. Dogs and hunters can get hurt and quite a few butchers will not butcher pigs hunted this way as they think it is crule. As this is a contentious issue I am not going to debate this.

One thing for sure is that I am not fit enough for wild pig hunting.
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Post by sawhorseray » Wed Nov 13, 2013 23:32

The taste of wild hog meat can range from gourmet quality to unpalatable. The variables include age, sex, time of year, how and when they are field-dressed, and most important, diet. I haven't whacked a boar hog in maybe 10-12 years now, they can taste far more gamey than the sows. I like to shoot sows that are either feeding in grain fields or dining on acorns depending on the time of year. Hogs that are feeding in grain fields put on a nice layer of white fat very quickly, wild hogs that dine on acorns provide meat with a nice nutty flavor to it. An old stinky boar hog that might have been eating the carcass of a dead cow or deer is plain unfit to eat, you can't get the backstrap past your tonsils.

Hunting with dogs and blades is a young mans game and you have to take what you get. I try to be quite a bit more selective and drop them in their dinner plates when they have no idea what's coming.

The sausage came out really nice, last nights pizza was fantastic! RAY

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Post by grasshopper » Thu Nov 14, 2013 02:03

Ray
Pat yourself on the back. You did more work on your project than most people do in a couple of months. Hunting excluded, that is pleasure. Nice job and the pizza is my kind of pizza.
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Post by two_MN_kids » Thu Nov 14, 2013 05:47

I use a Bradley Digital SS six shelf smoker. I think it's at least four years old. I have never successfully used it to finish cooking any sausage after smoking it. On the three occasions I have tried, I end up with dry, unpalatable, pieces of jerky. Until yesterday, all my sausages were finished by poaching. Bacons, hams, turkeys, and loins were finished in my kitchen oven. I just don't even try anymore!

Yesterday I mixed a 1.5 kg batch of Kabanosy, and stuffed it into 21mm collagen . I allowed it to hang at room temperature for 2 hours, then moved it to the Bradley. After ½ hour of drying, I gave it 1 ½ hrs. of Hickory pellets. (Haven't used the expensive pucks since I bought the A-MAZE-N-Pellet-Smoker). When the smoke finished, the IMT was 117°F. The meat sticks were moved to a 250°F preheated oven. In 12 MINUTES they had reached an IMT of 157°F, and by the time I got them out of the oven, they were at 160°F.

Total time from stuffing to cooling was 4 ¼ hours. Finished weight was just under 1.5 kg.

I left it to dry in a 45°F room for several hours. I know CW said to dry them for a couple of days, but the last time I did that, they turned Blue from a light coating of mold. Not just spots, but completely covered in it. I wiped them with vinegar, but it came back in a few days. Not cool!

I'm wondering if anyone else has had this problem? Has anyone considered/attempted drying them in a dehydrator to a 45% weight loss? I'm thinking of giving it a try. It will be more effect than hanging for two days, and that's two days less for a chance of the mold to grow.

Jim
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Post by crustyo44 » Thu Nov 14, 2013 07:11

Hi Jim,
I have never ever had a blue mould on any of my smoked sausages. I will be waiting to see what the experts have to say.
You might have some residual spores in the room where you dried the sausages, that's all I can think of, that's a rough guess though.
Are you a cheese maker as well?
Regards,
Jan.
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Post by Chuckwagon » Thu Nov 14, 2013 07:51

Jim, after smoking them, try drying them in the open air - perhaps on elevated screens on a table - somewhere with plenty of ventilation. I even use fans to help develop the pellicle. I believe any bluish mold would be residual from another application or source.

Best Wishes,
Chuckwaogn
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by sawhorseray » Thu Nov 14, 2013 08:32

That's a rough nut Jim, I can feel your pain. I've smoked sausage about a dozen times and never encountered your problem, tho I'd toss the entire batch if I did, mold is nothing to be taken lightly. I'd suggest going over your entire process with a fine-toothed comb, must be a bug somewhere. Good luck, and be careful. RAY
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Made Brats

Post by Shuswap » Thu Nov 14, 2013 18:38

I`ve set up my work area in the laundry room because my wife is a very active cook and I don`t want to be under foot because getting the look is scary. You will see that the work area is a piece of tempered glass that I had - no I don`t cut meat on it - but it is easy to keep clean.

http://i245.photobucket.com/albums/gg69 ... 2f2807.jpg

I made Brats today with a pre-mixed seasoning. I cubed the meat for grinding and washed off the salt on/in the casings.

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I`ve started using my own seasoning using established recipes but need to use up the pre-mixed too so no recipe to provide.

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From beginners tips I`ve charged the casing with some water to make it easier to get on the stuffing tube and it works.

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I`ve been having trouble stuffing the casing but this seems better.

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I followed Ray`s advice and marked link lengths on my table. The short one is from a stuffing problem along the way and the long one is the remainder after making links.

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Throughout the process the meat was in room temperature for less than 45 minutes. The grinder parts and stuffer were used cold from the fridge. My cost for 24 - 5 in links was $8.00. We had patties from the surplus meat left in the stuffer and tube for supper - sooooo good!
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Post by sawhorseray » Thu Nov 14, 2013 19:07

Beautiful piece of work, really well done! Making sausage is the gift that just keeps on giving, there's no stopping you now. RAY
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Post by Chuckwagon » Fri Nov 15, 2013 21:42

Nice looking stuff Ray ol' pard. Lot's of hard work eh? And the pizza looks terrific.
Shuswap is lookin' good too. The brats look very nice.
Ahem.... Ahem....!!!
And now... the best looking kabanosy award goes to.... Cabonia (Jeff) in Morgan Hill, California.
Cabonia wrote:
The last time I made kabanosy it lost a lot of fat in the oven and came out dry, which is why I brought it up to temp as slowly as I could. I guess that made the difference, because the texture is good and the sticks are just juicy enough for my tastes. The batch is drying now for a day or two, and then the texture should get even better.
Wow, that is professional-looking quality. If that stuff tastes as good as it looks, then you'd better lock it up!

Nice goin' folks. Keep up the good work.

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by Chuckwagon » Mon Nov 18, 2013 08:45

TYPE 2 - Cooked n` Cured Sausages

Hi smoke addicts!
We haven`t heard from Tazplas, DDWaterdog, SAR, MRMatuszek, Pignout, TruckTramp, Doug, and Ottothecow. Are you folks grindin` and smilin`? Are you shy like El DuckO? :roll: Oh, I know... we are all behind in our reading just a bit. It`s alright. Catch up when you can.

Right now let`s press on to some more information and another project. Let`s learn about curing and cooking sausage. Some types are dried to reduce bacteria - some are cooked. Please read the following pages by Stan Marianski, then let`s get a good discussion going about any questions that arise. Be sure to keep your notebook current and jot down any questions you have.

READING:
drying - http://www.meatsandsausages.com/sausage-making/drying
smoking - http://www.meatsandsausages.com/sausage ... oking-meat
cooking - http://www.meatsandsausages.com/sausage ... oking-meat

DISCUSSION:
For the next part of B2, let`s consider casing and cooking the sausage for protection against the effects of pathogenic bacteria. If we case the sausage, we cut off oxygen. Inside a warm smoker, pathogenic bacteria have direct access to nutrient, moisture, anaerobic atmosphere, and they`re inside the temperature "danger zone" of 40-140°F. These conditions warrant the use of Cure #1 (also called Prague Powder, Instacure, Pink Salt, etc.) This is sodium nitrite on a salt carrier and it becomes a "must" in our smoked recipes.

One of the easiest to make, yet most tasty sausages of this type is the "summer" sausage - not traditionally made during the summer months, rather consumed during the summer! Later, we`ll get into the addition of bacterial cultures. For right now, we can begin to understand the effects of fermentation by observing "chance contamination" and bacterial development. Historically, the air-dried favorite has been made during the colder winter months, becoming bacteriologically stable as it dried slowly.
Post any questions that come up during the reading.

PROJECT:

As the holidays approach, you may be interested in making a few fancy-wrapped and netted "smoke-stick" sausages for gifts. Everyone likes a summer sausage, a little cheese, some home preserves, and some crackers in a basket. When I make this sausage, I like to use the 76 m.m. mahogany-colored casings(Sausagemaker #26200) filled and placed inside a dark brown plastic diamond-pattern presentation netting
(Sausagemaker #13513). Twist the netting and clamp it off using a hog-ring. Tie a fancy Christmas bow around the hog ring and you`ve got a great-looking and great-tasting gift that anyone would like to have. They are best made about 2 weeks before Christmas and kept refrigerated. Don`t fudge on the ingredients or the procedure. Follow the directions carefully and you`ll have a sausage that will help build your reputation as a craftsman.

"Sunrise Summer Sausage"
Semi-Dry-Cured Summer Sausage

6 lbs. pork butt
4 lbs. beef chuck
2 level tspns. Cure No. 1
5 tblspns. uniodized salt
4 tblspns. corn syrup solids
4 tblspns. powdered dextrose
6 oz. (170 gr.) Fermento
1-1/2 tspns. garlic powder
2 tblspn. mustard powder
1 tblspn. ground coriander
1 tspn. allspice

Separate the fat from the lean meat and cut only the fat into 3/8" dice. Place it into the freezer. Grind the lean meat through a 3/16" plate then add all the other ingredients, mixing the Prague Powder #1 with a little ice water for even distribution. Mix the lean meat until the actomyosin develops the "primary bind" and becomes tacky. Finally, add the larger diced frozen fat and carefully fold it into the meat, distributing it evenly.

Stuff the sausage into your favorite casings (see paragraph below), hang them on smokesticks, and allow them to ferment 24-48 hours at 85°; F. (29°; C.) in 90% relative humidity. I have known sausage makers, fearing spoilage, who have preferred to place the sausages inside a 38°F. cooler (at a much reduced humidity) for a period of 48 hours at this point. Note that at this lowered temperature, the activity of lactobacillus is greatly reduced, requiring more time for fermentation to take place.

Some degree of fermentation will be accomplished by the "chance contamination" of lactobacillus or pediococcus bacteria nourished by the dextrose and corn syrup solids. Note that Fermento is not a starter culture. It is simply a flavoring ingredient made from whey in the dairy industry. It gives semi-dry-cured summer sausage a proper boost of "tang" and it is produced and sold by the Sausagemaker™. It is an organic product and may be used safely.

Next, pat the sausages dry, hang them in your smoker, and introduce smoke for 5 hours, dropping the relative humidity to 70%. Gradually, increase the smokehouse temperature only a few degrees every twenty minutes or so, until they reach an internal meat temperature of 148°;F. (Any possible trichinella spiralis has been destroyed at 138°; F.). Shower the sausages with cold water until the internal meat temperature drops below 80°; F. (26°; C.). Pat them dry and allow the sausages to continue drying at 65°; F. (18°; C.), three more days in 70% humidity. Now is the time to "bite `em"! At this point, your summer sausage could possibly require "extensive taste testing", usually performed with the assistance of several stout, ice-cold, foaming, beverages. Store the sausages at 50°; F. (10°;C.) in 75% humidity.

Traditionally, sewn beef middles about two feet in length and almost 3" in diameter were used for summer sausage. I`ve had great success with 3-1/2" diameter fibrous casings cut two feet long. Placed in dark brown netting, the product is very presentable and popular as gifts. Most folks today prefer much smaller summer sausages, using 38 m. m. hog casings or mahogany-colored synthetic fibrous casings cut about a foot in length.

This is "Cervelat" summer sausage with coriander. If you wish to make "Goteborg" summer sausage, delete the coriander and substitute up to 2 tablespoons of ground nutmeg.

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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