Online Workshop: Project B2 (October 2013)

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Chuckwagon
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Post by Chuckwagon » Tue Oct 29, 2013 04:12

Yahooooo Duck! Nice recipe sir! Many thanks! I am going to try Melissa Guerra`s recipe first then yours. I am intrigued by the method of preparation. Drying the seeds, salt in the vinegar, etc. You've really got this stuff down to a fine art. I hope people have read your book. I sure have. It should be in print pal! Thank you so very much for your expertise and sharing.
However.... I still believe you are "quacked"! :mrgreen:

Best Wishes Pal,
Chuckwagon
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Post by markjass » Tue Oct 29, 2013 07:44

Can taste it. I will slap inside some pita bread and pan cook it until the bread is crisp. For a work lunch or tea I will omit the egg, mix it with feta cheese and some fried onions and Chipotles en Adobo sauce and use a toasty to cook it.

el Ducko I Had a look at your chapters I did not know where to start, but now I do.

Thanks e.d I love Chorizo's and cw for getting project b going. I think that project Y as in yum is a good name for this project. It is great looking at peoples pictures. A couple of them got me thinking and resulted in me weighing the fat from the pork shoulder that I used. I was adding extra back far. I found that I did not need to add as much backfat as I was.

Do you people use the pork skin in sausages as part of the fat amount? I have not been. I have loads in my freezer. I use it to flavour stews and beans.

Oh yes. I noticed that, unusually you used Iodised salt in your recipe. In NZ there is a lack of iodine in the soil (as well as other things including selenium). That is why I use iodized salt in many things (not sausages, preserves etc).

Mark
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Post by el Ducko » Tue Oct 29, 2013 12:06

markjass wrote:el Ducko
4.04 tsp 10.1 gm 2.00% chile-ancho
2.08 tsp 5.20 gm 1.03% chile-pasilla
Have not got pasilla. Would Guajillo or serento or chipotle do do as a substitute. Which would you suggest.
Mark
From http://www.chilipeppermadness.com/chili ... IcY_Gdy34E "Our Chili Pepper List," comes the following:
● An Ancho pepper is dried form of the poblano chili pepper.
● Pasilla or "little raisin" properly refers to the dried chilaca pepper. The chilaca, when fresh, is also known as pasilla bajio, or as the chile negro or "Mexican negro" because, while it starts off dark green, it ends up dark brown. It typically grows from 8 to 10 inches long.

So substitutions should involve a decision based on flavor/taste as well as "heat"/Scoville units. Here`s another handy table summarizing Scoville: http://www.produceoasis.com/TipOTDay_fo ... 26tip.html with some additions from various other sources. My best advice: go with a dried pepper with low Scoville value. It will taste slightly different, thereby allowing you to make your own "mark", Mark, on the chorizo scene. As long as it tastes good, no problem! Enjoy! WooHoo!

Chiles - Scoville Scale
Here is a listing of many peppers, from http://www.produceoasis.com/TipOTDay_fo ... 26tip.html
Bell (0 - 100)
El Paso (0 - 100)
Anaheim (100 - 500)
Paprika (250 - 1000)
Poblano (500 - 1000)
Pasado (dried Anaheim) (500 - 2500)
Ancho (dried Poblano) (1000 - 3,000)
Passilla (Chilacas, dried Chile Negro) (1000 - 1,500)
New Mexico Green Chile (Hatch) (1,500 - 3,000)
Guajillo (dried Mirasol) (2,500 --6,000)
Jalapeno (3,000 - 6,000....25,000)
Serrano (5,000 - 15,000)
Yellow Caribe (5,000 - 15,000)
Aleppo (10,000)
Cascabel (11,000)
Chipotle (New Mexico red chile) (15,000)
Chipotle (New Mexico Morita red chile) (15,000)
Chile de Arbol (15,000 - 35,000)
Asian Hots (15,000 - 30,000)
Hidalgo (15,000 - 30,000)
Serrano (15,000 - 30,000)
Crushed Red Pepper (California) (20,000)
Cayenne (30,000 - 50,000)
Tabasco (30,000 - 50,000)
Red Chile (30,000 - 50,000)
Chiltecpin (30,000 - 50,000)
Tabiche (30,000 - 50,000)
Bahamian (30,000 - 50,000)
Kumataka (30,000 - 50,000)
Piquin (30,000 - 70,000)
Thai (bird`s eye) (30,000 - 70,000)
Crushed Red Pepper (Indian) (40,000)
Saanaam (Indian) (40,000)
Aji (50,000 - 100,000)
Dundicut (Pakistan) (55,000 - 65,000)
Tien Tsin (Asian) (60,000)
Habanero (Scotch Bonnet) (300,000)
Naga Jolokia (1,000,000+)
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Post by markjass » Wed Oct 30, 2013 09:05

Tastes and flavours are such a personal thing. You can grow up with a particular herb or spice and like it or dislike it. Some flavours you can get to like over time and others you cannot find yourself liking. It may be association or just a dislike.

When I was about 17 I was lucky enough to get full sponsorship to do a month long outward bound course. Before I went I was not familiar with sourdough bread and was not that fond of salami or cheese. On return to the UK I could not get enough salami or cheese, but had developed an intense dislike of rye sourdough bread. Every so often I try some, but cannot get my taste buds around it. Yet I hand make all of our bread using a sponge (flour. Water and yeast) and sometimes leave it up to 3 days. The sponge is quite acidic. I love the taste of the bread. I have also made bread with a wheat starter that has been left to ferment without yeast and do not like it.

I mentioned that I am not keen on nutmeg or mace in fresh sausages. To me it leaves an antiseptic aftertaste. Yet it works for me in liver sausage or Mortadella. I also use it when I cure pancetta. I tend to substitute allspice for nutmeg or mace in fresh sausages. I associate mace, nutmeg and cinnamon with Christmas and to a lesser extent Easter.

As a child and young adult, caraway, dill, aniseed and fennel were flavours that I did not know. Caraway and aniseed took me a long time to get to like. I love them in sausages, but not so in bread. When I set out to make a sausage or whatever I may start with a recipe, but only use that as a start. I tend not to try and make an authentic dish as I am never sure what authentic is or how long it takes for something to become a tradition. I suppose what I am saying is if you are not after authentic and dislike a flavour try it a couple of times, you never know it may grow on you (make small batches) and if you still do not like it try and find a substitute.

Mark
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Post by markjass » Wed Oct 30, 2013 09:16

Saw this article on the BBC web page http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-24737588:

California city in Sriracha odour complaint

A California city has sued the maker of Sriracha hot sauce saying the factory's smell makes the area uninhabitable. . .

Getting some stuff in NZ is so hard and yet other things are so easy. It is very hard to get hold of pigs liver, beef middles, but is so easy to get hold of regular and obscure Asain and mexican spices and sauces. Bought some Srracha sauce. Tried 1/2 a teaspoon of it. Loved it. Will report back on el Ducko's recipe after the weekend. Somehow it will not be objective as I know I am going to love it.

Mark
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Post by el Ducko » Wed Oct 30, 2013 15:16

...hope you like the recipe, Mark. Feel free to tinker with it. ("We call that progress.") Trying the multitude of peppers that are available, toasting them, etc. could be quite rewarding, much like the variations in coffee selection and roasting. Most people won't be able to tell the difference beyond "okay" versus "yuk" (my wife reminds me not to over-step the line between "connoisseur" and "sewer"), but the possibilities are endless. What a great hobby!

I have the same (ambivalent) feelings about peanut products as you do about some flavors. We lived downwind from a peanut processing plant, back in my Army days. The first two weeks of the harvest season were wonderful, the smell of roasting peanuts in the air. Then, after the oil that settled on everything went rancid and the rats moved in to glean the missed nuts, it was horrible for about two months.

Maybe a little sriracha would have helped.
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Beginner's Sausage Stuffing

Post by Shuswap » Wed Oct 30, 2013 20:08

I'm really enjoying the B2 thread. In preparing for guests the next couple of weeks I have made a Bratwurst from prepared mix and Aidell's Iowa Sausage from scratch. I find it gets a little intense when stuffing as I have some difficulty getting the hog casing onto the horn and difficulty getting a nice uniform filled casing. Guess there is an art to it and I'll just have to perserve. As a trainer, I preach practice does not make perfect, only perfect practice does. Now I'm trying to relearn the steps of getting from mediocre to perfect. :neutral:
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Post by Chuckwagon » Thu Oct 31, 2013 04:08

Shuswap wrote:
I find it gets a little intense when stuffing as I have some difficulty getting the hog casing onto the horn and difficulty getting a nice uniform filled casing.

Okay pal, let's talk about that just a bit. That's the reason we have this Project B2 - to share information and solve problems.
I've found that a sharp pair of scissors makes a clean cut on the end of the casing. Use your forefingers and thumbs underwater and it should separate easily to gulp up a big water bubble and slide the end over the horn. Let the water bubble lubricate the horn.
Most ol' timers will chuck their plastic stuffing horns and use stainless steel. Buff and polish the end so the casing will slip right on. Remember to use water (in the bubble inside the casing) to lubricate the horn. Don't use butter, lard, etc. trying to make it slippery. It will affect the sausage later. Stick with water and practice. You'll get the hang of it soon.
Anybody else have a suggestion here? Let's hear 'em.

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by Thewitt » Thu Oct 31, 2013 05:24

One of the keys to uniform stuffing is to feed at a steady rate and provide just enough resistance to the sausage to get the firmness you are after.

Manually, a piston stuffer you can crank with one hand while caressing the casing with the other is perfect.

It's harder with a motorized stuffer at first, but practice will ultimately give you a feel for it.
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Post by Chuckwagon » Thu Oct 31, 2013 05:58

Hi Smoke chasers! :mrgreen:
I need a little input at this point. We've talked about "fresh" sausage and made some for breakfast. There's been quite a bit of reading but that's how we learn. I hope you are using the checkups to evaluate your progress. It's almost time to move on to "cured" sausages.

Right now, I need to know if we are going to fast or too slow. Let's hear some comments and suggestions. This is YOUR project so, let's make it comfortable. Learning the finer points of this hobby is fun and very much worth getting involved. But shucks, life gets in the way sometimes eh? Things happen that soak up our time or resources. Hey, I understand if we need to pause to catch up on reading etc. But you've got to let us know. We certainly don't want to lose anyone. Here's a list of the Project B2 outfit. Let's hear from you to see where you are in the project.

1. ssorllih
2. El DuckO
3. Sambal Badjak
4. AJWillsnet
5. Grasshopper
6. Tasplas
7. Redzed
8. Crusty44
9. Hamn'Cheese
10. DDWaterdog
11. SAR
12. M.D.Flan
13. Shuswap
14. MRMatuszek
15. Sawhorseray
16. Ursula
17. Markjass
18. two_MN_kids
19. Cabonaia
20. Pignout
21. TruckTramp
22. Doug
23. Ottothecow
24. mweipert
25. TSmodie
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by sambal badjak » Thu Oct 31, 2013 11:53

Well, I am still there and enjoying the project (a little distracted at the moment, watching 7 elephants preparing to go for a swim).....
I have skipped the fresh onion and sausages, liked my breakfast sausages and am still looking at kabanosy.
Got a question here, as my idea of coolish smoking was not considered safe, but it will only be 2 hours or so in the danger zone AND it will contain sodium nitrite, so looks pretty OK to me, also refering to this thread http://www.wedlinydomowe.pl/en/viewtopic.php?t=6734, more specifically, post 10 and 11 (i don't know how to link to these specific entries).
Other than that I could use a stovetop smoker, but that one will run at much higher temperatures.
I am also still looking for a single hot plate to use in conjunction with my cold smoke generator.

Next up, will be the chorizo. I could use the same recipe and stuff into sausage skins isn't it? I just like chorizo on the bbq, but am not too fond of it when fried like mince. Don't ask me why as I have no idea why!

I want to make some boerewors as well, there are just not enough hours in a day, or work tends to get in the way.

I am a bit behind with the reading, just need to work through the casings section and I am up to date again.
I find myself reading and re-readin Marianski's book. I have it on my kindle, but will actually order a hard copy as well (just easier to browse through).
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Too Fast - Too Slow?

Post by Shuswap » Thu Oct 31, 2013 14:58

CW the pace works for me but then I'm in charge of my own work schedule, although DW is loking over my shoulder :wink: I've made three batches of sausage in the past week so need to get down to eating it to create freezer capacity for more. The reading has not been a burden but then as a novice I'm still motivated to learn more. I've also found the input of others to be helpful. I do want to focus on fresh sausage for awhile until I get more comfortable with the "feel" of the process but I'm in for the long haul just might be behind in actual production.
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Post by sawhorseray » Thu Oct 31, 2013 20:07

I've been reading what's been posted but have been balled-up with some other activities, that's all behind me now. I'll be getting busy here very soon! RAY
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Post by Chuckwagon » Fri Nov 01, 2013 03:34

Cataract Canyon "Chipolatas"
Emulsified Sausages


Have you ever been to a cocktail party and been served a tasty, little, emulsified sausage that reminded you of an English "banger"? You probably tasted a Chipolata - the forerunner of the banger. They are made with emulsified pork and a few signature spices, stuffed into narrow sheep casing, twisted into links only 1-1/2 inches long, and baked or grilled immediately without smoking - thus the absence of Cure #1. They are a perfect snack for a party.

8-1/2 lbs. pork butt
1- 1/2 lb. back fat
475 ml icewater
120 g. dry bread crumbs
15 g. kosher salt
3 g. black pepper, finely ground
3 g. rubbed sage
1 g. dried onion flakes
1 g. dried thyme
1 g. ground mace

When meat is emulsified, a little added salt quickly develops the myofibrillar proteins actin and myocin. It is important not to "whip" the mixture with dull tools as this will result in a rubbery, overdeveloped texture. As a home-hobbyist, I use a Kitchen Aid food processor with blades I've sharpened (on one side only). Dull blades just rip and tear. Razor-sharp blades "shear" and cut fibers. With a little water added, the machine makes a smooth "paste" in no time at all. It`s important to use a processor having a "direct gear-driven" spindle rather than one with a belt drive. If you do not have a food processor, simply grind the meat and fat using the 3/8" plate and then again using the 1/8" plate. Be sure to use a little softened, chipped, ice in the mixture to keep it cool.

Cut the fat and meat into cubes and grind them together. Work in batches and keep them cold. Add the salt and make a paste of lean 80% pork and lean 20% backfat, and then refrigerate it. Put the water into a bowl and add the bread crumbs and the remaining ingredients and seasonings. Mix the ingredients thoroughly and then fold them into the meat mixture. Use a power mixer to distribute the seasonings equally throughout the meat then refrigerate it again. Finally, stuff 22-26 m.m. sheep casings and twist small links (only 1-1/2" long). Do not smoke these sausages unless you add Cure #1 to the recipe. These are "fresh" type sausages and should be refrigerated and cooked and consumed within a couple of days, or frozen for use later.

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by redzed » Fri Nov 01, 2013 04:36

Been a little preoccupied with mushrooms and other things, but have definately been readin'. My better half says I'm overloaded with information and will crash one of these days! :shock:

I did make some brats recently but did not want to enter them as part of B2 since I added mushrooms and cheese and borrowed a few things from Rytek.

However, I will be making a few Kabanosy in a couple of days and will make them traditionally, but with collagen casings.

CW, those little chipolatas might be good, but my reputation would go up in flames instantaneously if I made them. No one around here serves itsy bitsy weenies to their friends unless your name is Scrooge. :grin:
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