What Sausage To Make For A Beginner

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DelNorte
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Post by DelNorte » Thu Feb 27, 2014 19:43

Well amazing things do happen in Uruguay! The package Ray sent arrived :!: :!: :!: UNOPENED! :shock:
Maybe it's because the Uruguayans don't use but maybe 3-5 different spices and they had no interest in Customs. I really don't care. I'm so happy to have some Instacure!

How ironic that Ray and I have swapped a couple of messages today hanging our hats up on this package arriving.

So now Boys, and you Girls that I see once in a while here, I want to make some smoked sausages SOON. What would you recommend for a newbie?...

*thinking like a woman in a shoe store*... then I'm going to need some vittles to go with that on the side. What to make to go with the sausage? Oh have to have BEER for sure!
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Post by crustyo44 » Fri Feb 28, 2014 18:58

Hi Laurie,
Any popular smoked sausage recipe is great, like cabanossi, csabai etc, This all goes well with some home made sourdough bread, home made cultured butter, some cheese and a big fresh salad.
Nothing else is needed bar some good plonk or cold beer.
Good Luck,
Jan.
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Post by sawhorseray » Fri Feb 28, 2014 19:03

Well well, just as soon as I'd thrown in the towel on this project it came back to life. That's great! When looking for ideas regarding sausage recipes a great place to start is The Members Recipe Index, you'll be sure to find something that catches your eye. I very happy this came to fruition, kind of restores my faith in humanity. Good luck and enjoy! RAY

http://www.wedlinydomowe.pl/en/viewtopic.php?t=5146
“Good judgment comes from experience, and a lotta that comes from bad judgment.”
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DelNorte
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Post by DelNorte » Fri Feb 28, 2014 22:19

crustyo44 wrote:Any popular smoked sausage recipe is great, like cabanossi, csabai etc, This all goes well with some home made sourdough bread, home made cultured butter, some cheese and a big fresh salad.
Nothing else is needed bar some good plonk or cold beer.
Good Luck,
Jan.
I like the way you think! All of that sounds wonderful with sausage... btw, the we strained the first batch of wine a couple of days ago. Everything is going well with that. It smelled like a winery in here when we finished!
sawhorseray wrote:Well well, just as soon as I'd thrown in the towel on this project it came back to life. That's great! When looking for ideas regarding sausage recipes a great place to start is The Members Recipe Index, you'll be sure to find something that catches your eye. I very happy this came to fruition, kind of restores my faith in humanity. Good luck and enjoy! RAY

http://www.wedlinydomowe.pl/en/viewtopic.php?t=5146
I'll definitely look through the recipes there then. Thanks again so much for sending the stuff! You have no idea how grateful I am.

I'll keep you guys posted on what we end up making for the first round celebration, and if I can remember in my excitement I'll take pics.
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Post by redzed » Sat Mar 01, 2014 03:39

Dellie, don't do anything wild as far as the flavour panel. Stick to a few ingredients to appreciate the fundamental taste of a home smoked sausage. Not being biased in any way, :wink: I think the place to start would be a kiełbasa chłopska (peasant sausage). A medium to coarse grind, seasoned with salt, pepper, and garlic. You could add a small amount of marjoram, and/or a pinch of nutmeg or all spice, but no more. Stuff into whatever hog casing you have and smoke. That is what most beginners on the Polish WD forum start with. From there, grasshopper, the magical world of charcuterie is at your feet. :lol: :lol:
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Post by sawhorseray » Sat Mar 01, 2014 07:51

Nope, I don't agree. Salt, pepper and garlic will always be at your disposal, along with cilantro and peppers in that neck of the woods. Use the spices I sent to you and use your imagination. The 12oz of Instacure #1 will smoke a LOT of sausage, and there's fresh sausage to be made too. Now that this has worked once I'd have no problem doing it again, if you'd like . RAY
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Post by DelNorte » Sat Mar 01, 2014 12:30

You boys make me feel right at home here, with all of your help. I do appreciate it all!

Last night I was looking around online to see which big name stores here sell electric meat grinders/stuffers. It looks like I can get one for around $90. Casings, not a problem. See them everywhere sold.
redzed wrote:Dellie, don't do anything wild as far as the flavour panel. Stick to a few ingredients to appreciate the fundamental taste of a home smoked sausage. Not being biased in any way, :wink: I think the place to start would be a kiełbasa chłopska (peasant sausage). A medium to coarse grind, seasoned with salt, pepper, and garlic. You could add a small amount of marjoram, and/or a pinch of nutmeg or all spice, but no more. Stuff into whatever hog casing you have and smoke. That is what most beginners on the Polish WD forum start with. From there, grasshopper, the magical world of charcuterie is at your feet. :lol: :lol:
I've not seen any pheasant down here Sensei. I do see thousands of doves and even big quail in the country. I'm sure I'd get a strange look if I asked anyone where I can get some to eat. They cage quail to harvest eggs. The doves are quite small. I'm going to have to stick with pork, chicken, and beef. At the moment I don't feel like having the stare of shock. You'd think by now I'd have built up a tough skin to people giving me the "that gringa sure is strange in what she eats" look... but I was thinking a keilbasa of some sort would be nice. :smile:
sawhorseray wrote:Nope, I don't agree. Salt, pepper and garlic will always be at your disposal, along with cilantro and peppers in that neck of the woods. Use the spices I sent to you and use your imagination. The 12oz of Instacure #1 will smoke a LOT of sausage, and there's fresh sausage to be made too. Now that this has worked once I'd have no problem doing it again, if you'd like . RAY
Ray the Man, I have to correct you - Uruguayans have no Méxicano tendencies in their comida. It's bland home cooking style from the states, and little variety in that. So not a whole lot of hot peppers here and sadly I've never tasted a single dish with cilantro in it. It's not to say that the other South American countries don't have some nice spice to their food, though... Since my husband has never experienced a smoked sausage before, I want to do something nice. Garlic for sure and light spicing I think. I want to also make some nice breakfast sausage for him, which does not exist here. I think he'd like some homemade English muffins with that on it.... what's the average amount of Instacure #1 to meat ratio?... I'm still searching high and low here for curing salts. I don't want to burden you, but if I can't find them I might be taking you up on your kind offer. :wink:
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Post by jscarbo » Sat Mar 01, 2014 13:17

DelNorte wrote:I'm still searching high and low here for curing salts.
Del Norte, in Costa Rica where I live, curing salt #1 is called sal praga and is sold by bulk spice vendors in the mercado central. Also, many carnicerias use it and may sell you a small quantity or tell you where you can buy it.
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Post by DelNorte » Sat Mar 01, 2014 14:59

jscarbo wrote:
DelNorte wrote:I'm still searching high and low here for curing salts.
Del Norte, in Costa Rica where I live, curing salt #1 is called sal praga and is sold by bulk spice vendors in the mercado central. Also, many carnicerias use it and may sell you a small quantity or tell you where you can buy it.
Thanks for the info. In the city that I live in I've not found a specialty shop selling large varieties of spices. I'm trying to find one in the capital city (surely there is one), but it's not easy since I live 5 hours from there... Great idea about talking to a butcher. There is one that we go to regularly and have a nice relationship with. I'm going to ask him. Can't hurt. I'm already on the "none" side of the fence. :lol:
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Post by jscarbo » Sat Mar 01, 2014 15:48

We don't have specialty shops for such things in Costa Rica either and it can be a challenge to find sources but usually I find that if I ask the right person they will steer me in the right direction. Surely curing salt is readily available because it is so widely used for chorizos, bacon, etc. Any butcher or sausage maker should be able to help you find a source for curing salt, sausage casings (tripas), etc.
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Post by sawhorseray » Mon Mar 03, 2014 17:36

Hey Delnorte, maybe think of giving this recipe a shot, it's toolmann's from another thread:

Gyulai Kolbasz

pork shoulder fat ratio 8,5-1,5%
salt 22g
cure #1 2,5g
sweet red paprika 6g
hot red paprika 2g
chilli 2g
white pepper 2g
black pepper 2g
fennel 1g
garlic 5g

cube the meat let it rest in the fridge for 24hrs , grind fat thru 3mm plate , mix all the ingredients together , let rest in the fridge for 24 hrs , grind everything thru 6 mm plate , mix well again , stuff into 30-32 mm casings , make 30-40 cm long pairs , let hang to cure for 2-3 days , cold smoke to redish brown colour , hang to dry in a cool place and store away .

If you use the cayenne that was sent in place of the hot paprika this recipe has a lot of potential. I make a smoked Kolbasz that's very similar that we love, and I substitute cayenne for the hot paprika called for. My recipe calls for some Hungarian Tokay wine which I doubt would be available to you. Good luck! RAY
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Post by Carpster » Tue Mar 04, 2014 20:31

DelNorte wrote:

I've not seen any pheasant down here Sensei. I do see thousands of doves and even big quail in the country. I'm sure I'd get a strange look if I asked anyone where I can get some to eat. They cage quail to harvest eggs. The doves are quite small. I'm going to have to stick with pork, chicken, and beef. At the moment I don't feel like having the stare of shock. You'd think by now I'd have built up a tough skin to people giving me the "that gringa sure is strange in what she eats" look... but I was thinking a keilbasa of some sort would be nice.
I agree with Ray...the pheasant would be a little strong tasting for your first experience at sausage making. Pork is the best... a nice shoulder or a picnic roast will work great. Using the ingredients for Kabanosy and stuffing in whatever you like would be your best option. Keep it simple... grind your pork, add all spices and cure to meat, mix with hands until sticky, stuff and refrigerate 24 hours. Smoke or not, bring internal temp to 156 degrees, cool and eat. Your husband will love it. If you can set some a side for about 5 days it will be a little firmer and taste better after all spices marry up!!!


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Post by Bob K » Tue Mar 04, 2014 21:37

What a difference an H makes.

redzed wrote: kiełbasa chłopska (peasant sausage). A medium to coarse grind, seasoned with salt, pepper, and garlic. You could add a small amount of marjoram, and/or a pinch of nutmeg or all spice, but no more. Stuff into whatever hog casing you have and smoke. That is what most beginners on the Polish WD forum start with. From there, grasshopper, the magical world of charcuterie is at your feet. :lol: :lol:
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Post by Carpster » Wed Mar 05, 2014 00:20

Too funny....I like your style Bob!!!
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Post by redzed » Wed Mar 05, 2014 07:33

I thought that DelNorte was only kidding, but it looks like she actually thought I was suggesting a bird sausage. :lol:
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