Question for Australian members.

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Ondaderthad
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Question for Australian members.

Post by Ondaderthad » Sun Feb 01, 2015 04:15

In Australia we can get a product called Pickled Pork. I am not sure if it's the same in other part of the world. They also make pickled beef and even lamb.
It is usually much cheaper than the fresh meat equivalent.

What I want to know is if it's suitable to make salami. The package shows that it contains salt and some "preservatives" ie. Cure.
crustyo44
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pickled meat

Post by crustyo44 » Sun Feb 01, 2015 07:32

Hi Ondaderhad,
The reason pickled meat, be it beef, pork or lamb (old sheep) is because it's pumped up with water, salt and spices, most times up to 40%.
It's unsuitable for salami making as far as I know, salami is made from fresh meat and as you know needs to be dried before it's consumed.
Imagine starting with meat that is 40% fluid, your salamis will float in it's own injected fluid.
You live in Brisbane, where do you purchase your meat for your hobby.
The reason I mention this is because if you buy from MEGA MEATS, you could have bought pork forequarter for $ 3.99 a kilo last week.
Email or message me, I might be helpful to your wallet and I like to get into contact with you.
I live on the Southside of Brisbane.
Cheers,
Jan.
Ondaderthad
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Post by Ondaderthad » Sun Feb 01, 2015 15:07

Unfortunately I live on the North Suburbs of Brisbane. I buy meat from Jack Purcell.
northener
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opti start sprint

Post by northener » Fri Apr 08, 2016 10:34

any body tried this
crustyo44
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Post by crustyo44 » Fri Apr 08, 2016 11:28

Northerner, Hi, I imagine that you are planning to make Salami. Do you have a temperature/humidity controlled curing chamber?
You will need one if you live in Townsville. The Tropics is not the right place to make these specialty sausages unless you have the correct equipment.
If you have no curing chamber you will have to convert an upright all fridge or freezer or a large wine fridge.
Some good posts on the forum and/or the Net to make one.
Email me if you need some more info. I am in Brisbane.
I will be away for 5 weeks from next Friday for a European holiday.
Cheers,
Jan.
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Post by northener » Sun Apr 10, 2016 03:17

hi crusty can i use a standard wine fridge i think it will run at 19c i am going to use 1 of the dry sausage recipes on this site but the only starter culture i can get is the opti sprint also can u tell me how do i no when there ready to eat do they lose 30' of there weight thks lance :?:
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Post by LOUSANTELLO » Sun Apr 10, 2016 14:38

Hello Northerner. There's a couple of things I would recommend. I think 19c is a little high. I would be using 13-14c. Monitoring and keeping your humidity is also crucial. There is also a fermentation time that is required at a much higher temperature depending on the starter culture specifications. This time is variable depending on the specific time to which it takes for your meat to reach a PH level that is safer for curing. This should be checked using a PH meter and I highly recommend one. Trust me, this all sounds very technical and my family in the old days never bothered with any of this. My brother still uses the old processes. I just started making my own 4 months ago and this forum has been very helpful understanding the technicalities. I was originally reluctant to purchasing a PH meter. Now that I have it, it's just another variable that is no longer in question. By the way, most salumi is safe at the 35% weight loss, although even though it's safe, I chose to dry mine out a little longer. After 35%, it's just to your liking of texture. You have to also decide how you are going to preserve the product once it gets to your satisfied dryness. Most people here will remove the casings and vacuum pack them, then store in a refrigerator.
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Post by crustyo44 » Sun Apr 10, 2016 20:03

Hi Lance,
A wine fridge runs lower than 19C. believe me, the wine fridge I have runs at approx. 14C all the time. Obviously you can control the temperature by outside electronic controls. Easy and cheap. Humidity might not be a problem in Townsville but you have to play that by ear.
Do remember it all depends on the size of the wine fridge, single or dual temp controls etc etc.
I will send you some info of the wine fridge conversion he is using. It's on this Forum somewhere but I can't find it. Matter of fact I have to find it on my computer as well.
I have never used a culture in salami making, just cure #2, salt and spices.
The old Italian way, I like them that way. Obviously when I come back from Europe in 5 weeks I will have a go at using a culture, if only just for a comparison.
I usually follow Robert Goodrick's instructions and never had a failure yet.
Cultures etc are available from www.mblsa.com.au. under smallgoods ingredients. The even stock the mould 600 now after al lot of requests from our Australian members. They are the cheapest on the market and we need to support them. When you buy cultures from them ask to ship by express post for obvious reasons.
By the way my wine fridge is a model BRANDT, approx. 177cm High and 60 cm wide and deep. Keep in touch.
Jan. janooms@bigpond.com
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