Saucisson Sec for Everyone

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redzed
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Post by redzed » Mon Feb 12, 2018 16:25

STICKSTRING wrote:Redzed,
The addition of sugar in this recipe, is it merely for flavor? Without the elevated temperatures to ferment I would have to assume there is very little to no fermentation going on.
There will be a level of fermentation that will occur even at the very low fridge temps and then some while the sausage will be hanging in the chamber. The meat doe contain naturally occurring lactic bacteria. Even a small amount of acidity will help protect the sausage, but without actually bringing the pH to 5.3, we can't construct that particular hurdle. Furthermore, the naturally occurring micrococci bacteria (Staphylococcus and Kocuria) also metabolize sugar.

You question is a very good one and worthwhile of some experimentation. The next batch of dry cured sausage that I will make, I will track the pH from start to finish, and post the results.
Last edited by redzed on Mon Feb 12, 2018 17:30, edited 1 time in total.
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Post by STICKSTRING » Mon Feb 12, 2018 17:02

That would be fantastic redzed. I would love to review your results!
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Post by muxmun » Fri Mar 23, 2018 04:50

Red
I'm still new at this so my question is, what is class 1 pork? Would that be like a pork loin?

I plan on mixin this up next week and will get some ph readings along the way

Thanks...charlie
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Post by redzed » Fri Mar 23, 2018 06:24

Hi Charlie,
Take a look here: https://www.meatsandsausages.com/sausag ... on/classes

As you can see, a particular cut can have Class I meat, but of course it has to be trimmed and prepared to obtain that particular character. The loin has a lot of Class I meat, but you need to remove the silverskin, any connective tissue, the part that looks like a braid, and the excess fat. When processing a pork butt or picnic you can separate the meat into all four classes.
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Post by muxmun » Fri Mar 23, 2018 16:26

Thanks Red
I never thought about checking there. Like all the moderators here and everyone else participating here, I thank you all a bunch. This is a great siite for learning and info.

charlie
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Post by muxmun » Sun May 20, 2018 16:15

For everyone except for me..waaaa :sad:
Sooner or later I knew I would run into something that did not go as planned. I have no idea what went wrong but it sure enough did. Did this according to the recipe but in the chamber where humidity and temp controlled. Time to clean the chamber. This is the same sausage I could not get the mold 600 to grow on which from that post it was because it was a fibrous casing and kind of oily.

Anyone have any ideas of what went wrong without addressing the stupidity of the maker??

LOL :grin:


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Post by airbrush » Mon May 21, 2018 18:28

Wow, Maxmum, that looks like some serious fast drying sausage.
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Post by redzed » Tue May 29, 2018 09:06

Yikes! Looks like just about everything that could go wrong certainly did. I see lots of possible issues there: fatty connective tissue, oxidation, lack of bind/gelification, probable fat smearing, bacterial spoilage for starters. Can you give us all the details as to how you prepared this sausage?

When making dry cured sausages, there are a number of things that we have to be careful with. It really is a different approach than making a fresh sausage for the grill or a smoked sausage. The type and quality of the meat and fat is very important. Use lean pork with no connective tissue and and no soft fat. Add hard back fat or from the leg. Before grinding freeze the cubed fat and semi freeze the meat. Make sure your blades are sharp and keep the meat cold while mixing and stuffing. Don't add water, and if adding wine, no more than 50ml per kg. This recipe also call for pork casings up to 45mm, which will help in quicker lowering of the ph and drying.

But in the end, without having all the details, it is hard to analyze what exactly went wrong.
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Post by muxmun » Thu May 31, 2018 15:04

Red...Thanks for the feedback. In retrospect I did everything wrong. Not enough attention to cleanliness and sanitation. Fat was to warm when I ground it and too soft when I mixed it resulting in fat smearing. I'm sure I did not mix it enough before stuffing. All those things you have pointed out I am guilty of. I've learned a few things from this experience and will pay closer attention to detail.

I've made lots of fresh sausage Red and you are so right.There is more than a subtle difference between the two. I think I mixed the physics of fresh and and cured and the lesson here is it simply it can and should not be done.

Thanks Red

charlie
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Post by airbrush » Fri Jun 01, 2018 16:54

Good luck, Charlie. I've had some issues with a batch or two and I've literally cleaned up my act, paying a lot of attention to keep things cold and clean! :grin:
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Post by redzed » Sat Jun 02, 2018 04:08

Just don't give up Charlie. Once you get the grasp of the fundamentals, you will make great salami. And all of us experience a failed result time to time.
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