Portuguese Chouriço

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redzed
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Portuguese Chouriço

Post by redzed » Tue Feb 13, 2018 03:21

Portuguese Chouriço is related to the Spanish Chorizo, but definitely it's not the same. It has considerably less paprika than the Spanish version, is quite garlicky and is cold smoked before dry curing. This is a traditional generic version made with potassium nitrate (saltpeter), and without starter cultures. Very pleasant flavour, pairs nicely with a full bodied red wine.

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Meats
2.5 kg lean pork, no fat or connective tissue
500g pork back fat

Ingredients per 1000g (1 kg) of meat
Salt 25 g
KNO3 .4 g
Fine sugar (sucrose) 3g
Pepper 4.0 g
Smoked paprika 4.0 g
Hot paprika 3. g
Granulated garlic 4g
Sodium erythorbate .4g
White wine 30 ml

Instructions
1. Grind meat with kidney plate, cut fat into small cubes
2. Mix meat, fat, salt, saltpeter and sugar. Place in airtight container and allow to cure for 3 days in the fridge.
3. Add the rest of the ingredients, mix thoroughly.
4. Stuff firmly into 42+ mm hog casings and tie off into 10" (25 cm) rings.
5. Apply a thin cold smoke at 18° C (64° F) for 2 days, 8-10 hours per session.
6. Dry for 21-30 days at 12-15° C (54-59° F), 75-80% humidity.

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STICKSTRING
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Post by STICKSTRING » Tue Feb 13, 2018 04:28

Very nice sir
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Post by DanMcG » Tue Feb 13, 2018 15:16

Thanks for sharing the recipe I'd like to try this one.
One question, why do you wait 3 days before adding the spices?
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Post by airbrush » Tue Feb 13, 2018 16:14

I'm going to do this one as it sounds (and looks) great. Good job!!!!

Please someone school me on Sodium erythorbate and KNO3??????
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Post by Bob K » Tue Feb 13, 2018 16:49

That really looks good!. Especially without all the Paprika in most chorizo.
airbrush wrote:Please someone school me on Sodium erythorbate and KNO3??????
Redzed can add why he used pure Nitrate. With the short production time you can just substitute .25% of cure #1. The Sodium Erythorbate is a cure accelerator. You can use it to reduce the amount of residual nitrite in just about anything that uses cures, read more about it here: https://www.meatsandsausages.com/sausag ... /additives

Its available at most of the Sausage making suppliers and also some of the online spice stores like MY Spice Sage
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Post by Edna » Tue Feb 13, 2018 18:55

redzed,


OMG ! THANK YOU ! THANK YOU ! Now please try a sliceable linguica for all of us? Please, Please. Take care, Edna
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Post by redzed » Wed Feb 14, 2018 16:22

DanMcG wrote:One question, why do you wait 3 days before adding the spices?
Not exactly sure, but probably because it's usually not done. And the methodology in making cured dried sausages (not necessarily fermented), requires a curing/salting period, sometimes also referred to as "burning", so that the salt and nitrites wholly permeates the batter, lowering the water activity and making it more safe to be dried at warmer temps. But adding the spices at the same time would probably work as well.
airbrush wrote:Please someone school me on Sodium erythorbate and KNO3??????
Excellent question and the best way to answer it is to direct you to a discussion about it by clicking on the link below. Please read all the comments in the thread by Igor Dunczyk. Interesting take on the subject in that Marianski's opinion is different than Dunczyk when it comes to using S. Erythorbate in dry cured sausages.
http://wedlinydomowe.pl/en/viewtopic.ph ... rythorbate
Bob K wrote:Redzed can add why he used pure Nitrate.
I used saltpetre solely for the reason that I wanted to create a more traditional product. But in my continued experimentation with it, I am becoming convinced that using Cure #2, a mixture of nitrate and nitrite is more effective and results in a better product.
Edna wrote:OMG ! THANK YOU ! THANK YOU ! Now please try a sliceable linguica for all of us? Please, Please. Take care, Edna
Thanks Edna, I wish I could have shared some of it with you! :grin: One of these days I will have to have to make a linguica, so if you have recipe please share it. In the meantime, I will be making another dry cured chouriço, this time a regional one. So many sausages to make and so little time!
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Post by Edna » Thu Feb 15, 2018 00:22

redzed,

I ordered online for KNO3 etc etc to do your Chourico recipe. I do not have a Portuguese Linguica recipe. If you come over to Seattle, I will treat you to a delicious dinner made by me !
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Post by Edna » Tue Feb 20, 2018 23:19

redzed,

Hi there,

I hope you are doing great. What is lean pork? Did you use pork loin or pork butt sans fat? Also can I cure this is in a commercial walk in cooler that is 36 degrees Fahrenheit? Thanks, Edna
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Post by Edna » Tue Feb 20, 2018 23:22

redzed,

Hello,

For linguica I tried Ryan Farr's recipe. I cold smoked it for 4 hours and then air- dried it the whole day. Thanks, Edna
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Post by Kijek » Wed Feb 21, 2018 02:39

That stuff looks amazing, does the finish product have that "Tangy" taste like most store bought salamis?

I sorry I have to ask, as some of you may know that I do not favor that "Tangy" taste.

I would love to give this one a try for sure, those fat bits..... oh man! :grin:
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Post by redzed » Fri Feb 23, 2018 17:47

Edna wrote:I hope you are doing great. What is lean pork? Did you use pork loin or pork butt sans fat? Also can I cure this is in a commercial walk in cooler that is 36 degrees Fahrenheit? Thanks, Edna
When making dry cured sausages I almost always use lean pork without any connective tissue and soft fat. The meat can be from almost any cut of pork. In this particular recipe I used pork loin and picnic meats.

36F is too cold to dry cure and mature salami type products. All that will be happening is drying, you will not benefit from proteolysis which gives flavour and aroma to the sausage.
Edna wrote:For linguica I tried Ryan Farr's recipe. I cold smoked it for 4 hours and then air- dried it the whole day.
Can you post the recipe and pics of your linguica?
Kijek wrote:That stuff looks amazing, does the finish product have that "Tangy" taste like most store bought salamis?
No.
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Post by Edna » Fri Feb 23, 2018 18:21

redzed,

Thank you for your reply.

This is the Linguica recipe I did - kind of Ryan Farr's, my own input and from people all over the net.
Pork Butt - 120 oz
Pork belly - 60 oz
kosher salt - 79 gms
dextrose - 26 gms
cayenne powder - 23 g
oregano powder - 6 gms
smoked sweet paprika - 60 gms
black pepper - 9 gms
minced fresh garlic - 80 gms
red wine vinegar - 5 oz
cure # 1 - 14 gms
iced cold water - 8 oz

I ground the meat and fat in a fine grind. I mixed it all in my 80 quart hobart mixer with the spices, vinegar and water. When well mixed, I kept it in the walk in cooler for 3 days. Stuffed in hog casings. I hung in the walk in cooler for 3 days to form pellicle. Thought I was doing cold smoking in my cook shack smoker at 110 deg Fahrenheit for 4 hours. Well the result: It had flavor but the sausage was dense and no fat. Now I know the temp for cold smoking should be 64 degrees Fahrenheit to 90 degrees. I reckon you will always learn in life through your mistakes ! It sure is sliceable and has flavor but is dry. So if you are trying this recipe make it juicy. Please tell me what should I have done Mr. Redzed ??????Thank you and take care, Edna
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Post by Edna » Fri Feb 23, 2018 18:22

Bob K,

Thank you very much. Indeed I love this site and everyday I am learning a lot from all of you !
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Post by Bob K » Fri Feb 23, 2018 18:24

Just to clarify-
Edna wrote: Also can I cure this is in a commercial walk in cooler that is 36 degrees Fahrenheit? Thanks, Edna
redzed wrote:2. Mix meat, fat, salt, saltpeter and sugar. Place in airtight container and allow to cure for 3 days in the fridge.
It can cure at 36° f but for drying the temp should be:
redzed wrote:6. Dry for 21-30 days at 12-15° C (54-59° F), 75-80% humidity.
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