What is the Craziest Salami flavor you've ever made?

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Bob K
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Post by Bob K » Thu Apr 05, 2018 14:50

So I can't wait to share with you the process of this week's labor. I'm going to try and knock out about 8 different flavors of salami.
You are going to need a larger chamber!! :mrgreen:
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Post by cajuneric » Thu Apr 05, 2018 15:56

Red,

Unfortunately the cuisine is not very inspired here and as I've mentioned before there really isn't any charcuterie to speak of. Outside of one local family that makes sausages commercially (Berards) most of what Panama has to offer comes through the way of imports. Every now and again one will stumble on a little gem that offers a truly memorable experience.

What part of the country did you visit? Casco Viejo, the Canal? Did you make it up to the Highlands out by Costa Rica? We live in the valley alongside the Volcano Baru
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Post by Kijek » Fri Apr 06, 2018 20:00

Bob K wrote:Yes it is. I have never made one. Looks like a challenge to get cased :smile:
I was thinking the same Bobk, but then I thought, if you encase the tenderloin in the ground pork, then wrap the whole thing in the collagen paper, then stuff in the netting, one can most likely make an easy process out of it.
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Post by cajuneric » Fri Apr 06, 2018 22:19

It's actually an awesome process. I saw where they lay their force meat and make it a rectangle. Then the loin is placed right in the middle and the force meat is wrapped around it kinda like a scotch egg.

Finally collagen sheets are sewed together or natural casings are sewn together to bind it all up.. It's a wonderful byproduct of an extraordinary amount of work.

It would be a neat piece on a charcuterie table..


Eric
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Post by Kijek » Fri Apr 06, 2018 23:09

Cajun, that the idea I had, glad I'm not a ding bat
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Post by cajuneric » Fri Apr 06, 2018 23:40

Nice!!!! Great minds think alike
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Post by Bob K » Sat Apr 07, 2018 12:55

cajuneric wrote: It's actually an awesome process. I saw where they lay their force meat and make it a rectangle. Then the loin is placed right in the middle and the force meat is wrapped around it kinda like a scotch egg.
Well that part of the process is just like making a Jumbo Sushi roll. :smile:
Was the T.Loin spiced and cured prior to wrapping?

I think a great flavor would be to cure the T,Loin as if making an Orange Lonzino and wrap with Orange Fennel Salami.

http://www.wedlinydomowe.pl/en/viewtopi ... ght=orange

http://www.wedlinydomowe.pl/en/viewtopi ... ght=orange
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Post by Kijek » Sat Apr 07, 2018 13:23

like making a Jumbo Sushi rol
There you go another great mind in action :mrgreen:

Can that also be called thinking outside the box :roll:
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Post by redzed » Sat Apr 07, 2018 14:50

cajuneric wrote:Red,

Unfortunately the cuisine is not very inspired here and as I've mentioned before there really isn't any charcuterie to speak of. Outside of one local family that makes sausages commercially (Berards) most of what Panama has to offer comes through the way of imports. Every now and again one will stumble on a little gem that offers a truly memorable experience.

What part of the country did you visit? Casco Viejo, the Canal? Did you make it up to the Highlands out by Costa Rica? We live in the valley alongside the Volcano Baru
We were in Panama City for a week on an extended layover while on our way to Colombia. Explored Casco Viejo, hiked up Ancon Hill, and did a lot of walking round the city. Spent a couple of days watching the ships going through the locks on both sides. Also squeezed in a day of hiking in Chagres Park. Lot more to see and do, but just not enough time. :shock: :lol:
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Post by cajuneric » Sun Apr 08, 2018 20:44

We were in Panama City for a week on an extended layover while
As crazy as it sounds in the 7 years of living here I've never been to the canal... Not a big fan of the city.. I'm a mountain man myself!!!

So check out this update. 2 days ago I had my repair man make a late night call to finish getting my chamber up and running. Long story but the point is this. When making a chamber be careful when you start drilling holes all in the side of your fridge!! OOPS!

We finally got it fixed and working so I decided to dedicate all day yesterday to making salami. Here are the flavors that were made:

The Boquete Panama Salami (Coffee, Panama Rum, Mango, Passion Fruit, chocolate from the islands, the fruit from the geisha coffee plant, and habanero peppers)

The Andouille Salami (mace, bay leaves, garlic, thyme, salt pepper, cayenne, red pepper flakes, file, mustard powder, clove, and allspice. cold smoked for 6 hours then hung to ferment)

Blueberry and Date Salami (Dried Blueberries, dried dates, salt, pepper, garlic, white wine)

The Black Roasted Garlic Salami (Black garlic cloves, roasted garlic powder, white wine, cracked black pepper)

Blue Cheese, Cranberries, and Walnut Salami (Blue Cheese, Walnuts, dried cranberries, cracked pepper)

Cherry Pistachio Salami (Dried Cherries, Toasted and chopped Pistachios, white wine, black pepper, garlic)

Sundried Tomatoes Salami (Sun dried tomatoes with Italian herbs, cracked pepper, white wine)

Walnut, Fig and orange zest Salami (Walnuts, dried figs, orange zest, triple sec, clove, fennel, and cinnamon)


What I did was make 9 pounds of each one (3- 61mmx 24" salami's) Talk about a crazy operation. I managed to film it all so I'll end up putting it on youtube. I'm trying to pick a favorite based off of smell and the Black Garlic Salami as well as the Fig Walnut Salami smelled amazing. The Boquete Salami was right up there with the passion fruit/coffee/rum combination. Cant wait for them to dry up!!!

Here are a few pictures..




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Post by cajuneric » Fri Apr 13, 2018 05:42

Bob

"you are going to need a larger chamber"

You are right about that. Just this week I finished putting together my second chamber. The first one is packed!! What's cool is that my wholes muscles that I did when I first started are starting to come out. So as I cryovac them I'm.packing it full of more tasty product. Immgetting roughly 130 pounds of product in the first chamber and the second one is a bit smaller so ill only be able to get about 80 pounds in that one...

Some might say that I am the literal personification of the phrase"practice makes perfect". Right now I'm working on figuring out this whole pH busoness. Blc is a real tricky culture.. I'll get it though..





Bob

"Was the The Loin spiced and cured prior to wrapping?"


Yes. The video was in Italian and I could only understand about half but the filet was cured first. What's crazy is that upon reading the initial post I immediately called my butcher to place an order for fillet. Then quickly cancelled the order and told myself "not yet"!! I think with collagen sheets it might be a bit easier for me to make... In good time.

Now the fun stuff. Yesterday I made 20 pounds of salami Genoa and 15 pounds of salami Cremona as I was flipping through Mr. S. Mariansky recipes. The both looked awesome and very traditional. Tomorrow I'll be making 3 salamis with a slight Tang to them. I'll make 30 pounds of pepperoni (it looks and smells so good from the first batch I need to make it again). I'll make Spanish chorizo. That looks fun. And finally a brand new salami to add to the ridiculous flavors that I am experimenting with.

This one I'll call Korean kimchi salami. We make all kinds of crazy fermented foods for my business and kimchi is one of them I've come to really appreciate the tangy fermented cabbage rich with a smoky and spicy (slightly sweet) flavors. There is a funkyness to it that is strangely addictive. I'm still formulating the recipe but here's a rough draft

Lean pork 80%
Back fat 20%

Salt 2.5%
Cure 2 .25%
Dextrose .2%
Sugar .2%
Garlic powder .2%
Ginger powder .1%
Onion powder. .2%
Gochugaru (Korean red chili flakes) .7%
Gochujuang (Korean fermented chili paste). .5%
Fish sauce 2 tablespoons per 5 pounds
Fermented shrimp paste. 1/4 teaspoon per 5 pounds
Dried chives .1%
Mold 600
Flc starter .025%

Ferment at 80f and 85-90% humidity till pH reaches 4.7-4.9

Grind on 6mm plate and stuff into beef middles or 61mm collagen casings or whatever you want. It could be a snack stick it you want :grin:

I think that after tomorrow I'll be at Max capacity. :mrgreen:

I really like red'z orange lonzino. It is going in my to-do salami folder!!!


What are your thoughts on the new Korean kimchi salami?
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Post by Bob K » Fri Apr 13, 2018 12:29

cajuneric wrote:Ferment at 80f and 85-90% humidity till pH reaches 4.7-4.9
I would add the same amount of sugar as the peperone, or maybe .1 more. I don't think that the .2 and .2 will get you there. For more tang like kamichi I would go .5 and.5. You will find that the FL-C is much more predictable than 007

I am not sure if there are spoilage issues with the shrimp paste or fish sauce but you could consider finishing like a fast fermented semi-dry sausage...and also save chamber space and production time. :grin:

https://www.meatsandsausages.com/sausag ... i-semi-dry

If you make the Orange lonzino, don't be afraid to up the heat!! :wink:
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Post by cajuneric » Fri Apr 13, 2018 15:00

Good Idea with the sugar. The chili paste has a touch of sugar in it as well but I think you are right about increasing the values,,

Here's a snap shot of the mix this morning. I'm about to get crazy!!


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Post by cajuneric » Sat Apr 14, 2018 05:44

Ok.of all the flavors ive made in the last few weeks (14 different types) this mornings Korean Kim chi salami has got to be the weirdest. It really embodied all the flavors of authentic Kim chi. The smokiness from the red pepper flakes,. The spicy chili paste that's mildly sweet, the ginger coming through bring that Asian accent to this salami. Then there was the fish sauce and the shrimp paste. Both of these products are fermented and salted. Adding a unique umami style of funk that screams Kim chi. I'm afraid of what will happen in that casing. It's fermenting now. 10 pounds.

I can already see a big bowl of Kim chi fried rice and Korean salami
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Post by cajuneric » Fri Apr 20, 2018 04:55

Ok... A week has gone by and I had one of those crazy idea moments. What would happen if I made a bacon egg and cheese salami. It's a wild concept so hear me out.

We raise quails. My daughter has roughly 200 of them and their eggs are just amazing. Tiny little protein packed miniature eggs!! My plan is to make a cold smoked salami that has the breakfast elements in it but in a way that tricks the brain. Oh yeah. I want to pop quail eggs in it as well. I have a ton of them!!

First thoughts?


7 weeks to go for the reveal of all the crazy flavors!!!! Can't wait to share the footage with you.

Eric
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