Emulsified Sausages - possible alternative for a bowl cutter

joe_indi
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Emulsified Sausages - possible alternative for a bowl cutter

Post by joe_indi » Thu Sep 28, 2017 06:54

Hi, I am in India and I am new to this forum.
I have been trying my hand at sausage making for the past 2 years.
I have been reading up on the bowl cutter for emulsifying meat.
We dont get them here, but, we do have a table top grinder for making batters straight from grain. It does not generate heat. It uses an induction motor so it is silent and can run for long periods.
It uses stationary circular stones for grinding in a big 2.5 liter bowl with a stone inlay that rotates.
I have just bought this machine and plan to try it with my next batch of meat.
For getting an idea of how it works with grain I am posting a Youtube clip.
No mine.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hrQs68V1LM8
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Bob K
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Post by Bob K » Thu Sep 28, 2017 14:02

Welcome to the forum!
I don't think you can grind anything that's soft. Can you get food processors?
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Post by joe_indi » Thu Sep 28, 2017 18:44

Oh, I should have mentioned that I would be using this grinder only after running the meat through a 3mm plate of my mincer.
I do have food processors. But the blades spin too fast and tends to warm up the meat.
Plus none of the processor jars have decent capacities
Also, with our room temperature of 30 - 34C, I need to do all I can to make sure the meat does not heat up.
This grinder is slow enough to keep the meat cool and it costs only the equivalent of $ 150 here. So it is an experiment worth trying.

Thank you for the welcome
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Post by joe_indi » Sat Sep 30, 2017 15:04

I have just completed a test batch .
500gms beef
300gms pork
100gms trimmed fat
All were minced separately in my mincer. I added them one at a time to the wet grinder with about 200gms of crushed ice.
The meat was a fine emulsified paste.
I stuffed it into lamb casings and have hung them in an old refrigerator that i use for my curing.
Tomorrow I plan to smoke some and to cook some by steaming.
There was only one small goofup. I might have weighed the ice wrong. The emulsion seemed a bit too soft.
But the emulsion had not split at any time.
I will know tomorrow.
But, one thing is sure, this wet grinder did do the job !
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Post by redzed » Sat Sep 30, 2017 16:05

That is very interesting! I'm curious to see how the finished product turns out. I find it difficult to believe that mashing the meat batter can result in creating a sausage that is similar to one made with bowl cutter or another type of high speed chopper. What happens in a bowl cutter is a blending of the meat, fat and water into one homogenized consistency. This is achieved by finely cutting the meat and fat particles and making a batter that is fluffy and still sticky and not runny. I really can't see how that can be done with what is essentially a milling process. :lol:

But then, as I have said many times here, there is always more than one way to skin the cat, and this just might work. Please post pics of the finished sausage and let us know how it turned out.
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Post by joe_indi » Sun Oct 01, 2017 04:56

This is a picture of my grinder
Image

This is the mince after passing through a 3mm plate
Image

This is how it looks after 10 minutes.
Image

Unlike a processor this grinder does not generate heat. When we grind grain it remains cool even after 30 minutes of running.

The only goof up was I miscalculated the quantity of water to add. I added ice from 300ml instead of a safer 150ml.

But the emulsion is still stable as you can see from these sausages which I had kept in the refrigerator overnight.
My amateurish stuffing did get some air pockets in the sausages, but otherwise they sook fine.
They are in my smoker Self designed) right now.
Image

redzed, this grinder in its intended application of wet grinding grain gives a much finer batter than one made in a food processor, as a lot of us use them too.
I did try my food processor earlier but i find the results from this grinder much better, longer time required agreed, but it can be left un-monitored and needs no constant scraping down, which I have to do with my food processor. And, the best things is absolutely no heat generated.
Next time I try it (maybe in a couple of days) I shall post a video on You Tube.
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Post by joe_indi » Sun Oct 01, 2017 10:28

Sausages in smoker
Image

After 3 hours of smoke I immersed them in water at 75 C for about 20 minutes.
Then cooled them in water chilled with ice. Then I left them in my refrigerator to dry.
This is how they look after 3 hours
Image

Surprisingly they have become firm to the touch. But I will fry a couple both whole and cut and check.
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Post by joe_indi » Sun Oct 01, 2017 12:10

I tried a pair just now.
Thr first one I fried whole
The other I cut rounds and fried
They are firm, not losing shape and no liquid oozing out as from a broken emulsion.
They are firm but soft, none of the rubbery texture as in bought sausages.
Is that a good thing or bad?
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Post by Bob K » Mon Oct 02, 2017 12:49

Isn't your goal to to have a smooth texture like hot dogs or bologna/mortadella?
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Post by joe_indi » Mon Oct 02, 2017 18:28

That is my goal, the smooth texture you mentioned.
My first attempt at this was not too promising.
But I hope to reach that goal sometime. Though I see a lot more failures in the near future.
Last edited by joe_indi on Mon Oct 02, 2017 18:42, edited 2 times in total.
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Post by joe_indi » Mon Oct 02, 2017 18:41

Bob K, I need to thank you for mentioning Mortadella.
It seems Mortadella gets its name from the main tool that was originally used to grind the meat centuries ago, a mortar.
My grinder is a motorized mortar. Once I get the working right I hope to get that fine texture.
Thank you once again.
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Post by LOEBER74 » Tue Oct 03, 2017 15:59

The mortar is interesting. While not what you were after, the result looks tasty!!! good luck wit hthe research!!
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Post by redzed » Thu Oct 05, 2017 17:14

joe_indi wrote:It seems Mortadella gets its name from the main tool that was originally used to grind the meat centuries ago, a mortar.
I don't think so. It is and Italian name and has no connection to the English word "mortar".

According to Wiki:

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/mortadellaFrom Italian mortadella, from diminutive of Latin murtatum ("sausage seasoned with myrtle berries"), from myrtatum, from myrtus, from Ancient Greek μύρτον ...
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Post by joe_indi » Fri Oct 06, 2017 06:33

I admit my knowledge of Mortadella commenced when you mentioned it. So I might have been in error. The only infomation I had was from this web page > http://www.meatsandsausages.com/sausage ... la-bologna

and also what i read about the mortar being used in early times
Traditionally, the pork filling was ground to a paste using a large mortar (mortaio [morˈtaːjo]) and pestle. Two Roman funerary steles in the archaeological museum of Bologna show such mortars.
(from : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mortadella )
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Post by LOEBER74 » Fri Oct 06, 2017 14:56

Joe,

Do you have the source for the mortar you show in the picture? I am interested in finding one.

Thanks

Dan
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