Fresh Polish - garlic and color

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Krakowska
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Fresh Polish - garlic and color

Post by Krakowska » Sat Nov 17, 2012 15:32

Been making fresh and smoked Polish for years (couple times a year 30/40 lbs). Gave a lot away to family and friends and have been thinking of selling (at cost) to a few neighbors just to pay expenses and pass the time. Need help on how to keep the color from going to a grey, unappealing color of my fresh in a day or two. Nothing wrong with the taste but color does not hit it. Using kosher salt and fresh garlic. I'm thinking the fresh garlic is the culprit. Other ingredients are dry marjoram, ground black pepper. Casings are 28-32 mm hog.
By the way Chuckwagon, meet Micro Stan when I was up in Buffalo. Heck the Sausage Maker store is 3 miles from where i lived for 57 years. Very informative guy Stan is, could have talked for hours with him. Very nice gentleman.
Thanks in advance everyone. All information is MUCH appreciated. Krakowska
Last edited by Krakowska on Sat Dec 15, 2012 08:00, edited 1 time in total.
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Post by ssorllih » Sat Nov 17, 2012 15:58

Ascorbic acid helps with the color retention. But I don't know how much. If you sell at cost you are just making work and not covering your total expenses.
You could offer to teach sausage making in your home to groups of two or three. In that way you could charge for the teaching and the ingredients. You would make people happy, pass on your knowledge, productively fill some of your time and be able to feel good about yourself.
I am still trying to find a couple of pupils.
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Post by Chuckwagon » Sat Nov 17, 2012 19:15

Hi Krakowska,
Freshly cut meat is pink-red due to the reaction of myoglobin with oxygen. It turns gray as myoglobin changes to metmyoglobin. Packaging (and exposure to carbon monoxide) enhances and prolongs the red color. Commercially, many large outfits have turned to MAP gas (modified atmosphere packaging). A mixture of oxygen and carbon dioxide is flushed through the meat not only to retard the gray coloration but to delay bacterial growth (by the carbon dioxide). At home we have to improvise a bit. To keep the color from changing quickly and to make it last longer before turning gray, seal the meat and keep light from hitting it. Vacuum sealers such as "Foodsaver" et al. work very well.
Also, wrapping meat in aluminum foil first will block the light (although that is probably redundant if storing in a dark fridge). Or just wrap tightly in Saran wrap and then wrap again with foil.
A great alternative is to treat the meat with Cure #1 and smoke the sausages. The nitrite will keep the meat nice and red and the smoke will help develop a beautiful mahogany pellicle.
Hey Krakowska, I`m glad you met "Big Mac". Nice folks eh?

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
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Re: Fresh Polish

Post by Baconologist » Sun Nov 18, 2012 02:35

Krakowska wrote:I'm thinking the fresh garlic is the culprit.
Raw garlic can lead to discoloration. If it is the garlic, the only way to guard against it is to heat treat the garlic to inactivate the enzymes that lead to discoloration.
Godspeed!

Bob
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Post by ssorllih » Sun Nov 18, 2012 03:11

In most of our sausage the use of fresh herbs is considered a source of bacteria that can increase the risk of spoilage. Does fresh garlic fit in the catagory? Will garlic powder serve as well?
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Post by el Ducko » Sun Nov 18, 2012 05:56

While we're on the subject of fresh garlic, seems like a recent recipe called for soaking the garlic in water. Likewise, in Mexican cooking, freshly chopped onion is often rinsed with water, to get rid of the worst of the sharpness (probably the same reason as the garlic).

Would this treatment help reduce bacteria on fresh herbs enough to be significant? What do the commercial herb vendors do?
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Post by Chuckwagon » Sun Nov 18, 2012 09:48

Ol' pappy used to say... "Son, there are two things you just don't do... get on the right side of yer` horse and cook without garlic". Shucks, my pard Dutch Oven Dick wouldn't even speak to people who didn't eat or cook with garlic. He believed anyone not loving the stuff should be deported... from Earth! The opinionated sourdough, wearing the stuff around his neck, told me that garlic falls into two primary categories - hardneck and softneck. As the man spread it upon his toast, he explained that the garlic most of us cook with is of the "softneck" variety, which contains a circle of plump cloves shrouding a second circle of smaller cloves, all enveloped by layers of paper. Its neck is soft and pliable, it is heat-tolerant, stores well, and has become the country`s favorite commercial garlic. Hardneck garlic is distinguished by its stiff center staff, around which large uniform cloves hang. It is considered superior in flavor and more complex and intense than the softneck varieties. The original cultivated garlic, hardneck has a relatively sparse parchment wrapper making it easier to peel (and damage) than softneck and its thinly wrapped cloves lose moisture more quickly than the softneck variety. Dutch Oven Dick's favorites? The robust flavored hardneck varieties of course, including Porcelain, Zemo, Rocambole, and Carpathian.

Garlic, (allium sativum), just like the onion, belongs to the lilly family! It was first found near Siberia although it was discovered later to be growing wild in Sicily. Ancient Greeks and Romans believed a curious superstition - if a man running a race chewed a morsel of the bulb, it would prevent his competitors from getting ahead of him. Grown in England about the year 1540, the name garlic, derived from gar (a spear) and lac (a plant), is of Anglo-Saxon origin.

The majority of garlic in the United States is cultivated near Gilroy, California, and the use of it becomes more popular each year. Gilroy`s Garlic Annual Festival is something to behold! Surprisingly, although the ancient Romans enjoyed garlic, it was believed to be poisonous by many people scarcely over sixty years ago. Today a multitude of disorders are treated with garlic including hypoglycemia, arthritis, hypertension, and diabetes. Pappy used it to treat colds, ulcers, and insomnia. Now, doctors believe it has anti-carcinogenic properties, so cook with lots of it or eat it raw. If your horse complains about your breath, remove garlic`s aroma from your mouth and hands with coffee beans. If your mate objects to the odor of garlic, find a new mate! Drive `em off with 12 gauge buckshot, write his or her phone number upon several restroom walls, sue for divorce including punitive damages, and marry a garlic-loving individual, as he or she will most certainly exhibit a much higher intelligence quotient than your previous partner.

Many sausagemakers and cooks claim that crushed garlic added directly to sausage or food such as mashed potatoes has too much of a "raw edge" and recommend toasting several unpeeled cloves of garlic inside a dry, cast iron skillet over medium heat to tame the harsh flavor a bit. Shake the pan regularly until the skins are golden brown in about five minutes. The skins will almost fall off the cooked morsels. If you prefer creamier texture, increase the cooking time to as much as fifteen minutes. Quite a number of good panjanglers toast the stuff in a little olive oil and then add the oil to the spuds along with the garlic. In any event, be careful not to burn it as it may become bitter. The amount of flavor extracted from garlic depends upon the extent to which a clove is cut or crushed as the cells of the plant are ruptured releasing allyl sulfenic acid - an odorless chemical - combining with the enzyme allinase. The compound created is known as allicin - the stuff directly accountable for the fundamental aroma and flavor of garlic. The more the plant is broken down, the more enzymes are released as its "bite" becomes stronger. Cooks should realize that allinase becomes inert whenever heated beyond 150 degrees F. and no new flavors may be rendered from the plant - a desired characteristic when it comes to the preparation of "baked garlic".

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
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Post by Krakowska » Sun Nov 18, 2012 16:19

Thanks Fellas, Going to experiment next batch with garlic powder and ascorbic acid. I do have the food saver canisters and it does keep the sausage from discoloring. Chicken will last up to a week in them. I'm looking to get 2 days before any significant discoloration of the sausage. Anyone else use garlic powder in their sausages? Same results as fresh garlic? (taste) Thanks again Guys, Very Much Appreciated. :cool:
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Fresh polish

Post by bkamp » Sun Nov 18, 2012 16:26

Im no expert, but I have used sodium erythorbate, it is supposed to help add or retain color to the meat.

bkamp
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Post by Krakowska » Sun Nov 18, 2012 17:29

bkamp, do You use sodium erythorbate in your fresh and smoked? If so how much? Thanks
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Post by el Ducko » Sun Nov 18, 2012 17:35

Chuckwagon wrote:...told me that garlic falls into two primary categories - hardneck and softneck.
'round here, we have a "redneck" variety too, I suspect.
...er ...uh so they say.

...ever wonder who "they" are?
(...those little voices that CW keeps referring to, or is it, hearing?)

...and what did we ever do before they invented ellipses?
...huh? ...huh?
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Post by Devo » Sun Nov 18, 2012 21:21

I use Ames Phos (Amesphos)
Manufacturer: Ames Company
16 oz. Amesphos, specialty sodium triphosphate blend for meats, seafood and poultry.

AmesPhos improves texture, maintains that fresh-made taste, and reduces bacteria.

Phosphates are used in a wide range of processed meat, poultry and seafood in which they perform several functions. Phosphates improve the retention of natural fluids in the animal muscle that would otherwise be lost in the aging, cooking or freezing process. They also act as protein solubilizers to aid in binding processed meats. Their presence results in improved texture, flavor and color.

Due to a unique instantizing process and the combination of short and long chain phosphates, AmesPhos will dissolve completely at temperatures as low as 20 F and in the presence of salt. Additionally, AmesPhos will dissolve completely in hard water and will not cause phosphate precipitation.

Specifications:
Combination of: Sodium Tripolyphosphate; Sodium Pyrophosphate and Sodium Hexametaphosphate
Appearance: White granular powder

Advantages:
Improved cooked flavor.
Reduced loss of meat fluids.
Increased tenderness and juiciness
Improved firmer texture
Better and faster color development
Suggested usage levels:
One third to one half of one percent (0.3 to 0.5%) of the finished product weight.

For home sausage making: Use approximately one fourth to one half teaspoon per pound of meat. Dissolve the phosphate in water before mixing into the meat mixture. Mix into meat until well distributed, mix for approximately five minutes.

For dipping or soaking applications: AmesPhos is dissolved in water (5.0 to 7.0 % solution at 60 to 70 F, typically). Solution concentration will vary by application. The solution should be chilled, (33 to 35 F, typically) prior to use. The product is then dipped into the solution. This method is used primarily for seafood (scallops, shrimp, fish fillets, approx. a 2 minute dip.) and poultry (marinating of strips or breasts, 6 to 8 hour marinating). The age of the seafood will affect moisture retention so it is important to minimize any delay between harvest and phosphate treatment. Ask us about other marinades and pumping applications for meat, poultry and seafood.

The information and recommendations contained herein are, to our knowledge, presented in good faith and believed to be accurate. Because of the conditions of use, many of which are beyond our control, we make no warranties or representations, expressed or implied. The information is supplied upon the condition that the companies and persons receiving same will perform tests to determine the suitability for and purpose prior to use. In no event, however, will Ames Company, Inc. be responsible for damages of any nature resulting from the use or reliance of any information contained herein. Furthermore, nothing contained herein should be constructed as permission or recommendation to, infringe on any patent. No agent, representative or employee is authorized to vary any of the terms of this notice.
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Post by Gray Goat » Sun Nov 18, 2012 22:32

As for the garlic, I have started using roasted garlic in some of my sausages. It gives a mild but rich garlic flavor and I supplement with some powder as well.
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Post by el Ducko » Sun Nov 18, 2012 23:19

Seems like Ross and I had a discussion, not long ago, where the figure "two grams powder per one gram fresh" garlic came up. ...or was it the other way around? I can't remember. I like garlic in my sausage, so I'll say "use twice as much" and you guys can all jump on me.

I'll bet that roasted garlic gives a nice flavor to the sausage. It sure does to all sorts of dishes.

Free breath mints to whoever resolves this. :mrgreen:
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Post by ssorllih » Sun Nov 18, 2012 23:33

There is a grand recipe that calls for cutting the stem end from a full head of garlic annointing it with olive oil and raosting it until you can squeeze the cooked garlic out onto a thick slab of toasted bread. Cooking changes the taste and reduces the bite but doesn't spoil it.
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