Fresh Polish - garlic and color

bkamp
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Post by bkamp » Sun Nov 18, 2012 23:47

Hi Krakowska,

Ive used it in fresh and smoked sausages. The package says 1 ounce per 100 lbs, you'll have to do the math to match your recipe. Good Luck

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Gray Goat
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Post by Gray Goat » Sun Nov 18, 2012 23:57

ssorllih wrote:There is a grand recipe that calls for cutting the stem end from a full head of garlic annointing it with olive oil and raosting it until you can squeeze the cooked garlic out onto a thick slab of toasted bread. Cooking changes the taste and reduces the bite but doesn't spoil it.
That's exactly how I do it Ross, and you are correct when you say it is "grand" :grin:
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Post by crustyo44 » Mon Nov 19, 2012 06:25

Hi,
I put loads of garlic in my csabai sausage and stew them in some water until they are very soft, I put the garlic/water mixture, all the spices, salt and cure in a Breville whizz and whizz for 10 seconds.
The garlic flavour is out of this world, the water helps a lot to fill casings as well.
I will try the roasted garlic next time. In 7 kg of csbai I use 3 full heads of stewed garlic and the water.
Regards,
Jan.
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Krakowska
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Post by Krakowska » Tue Nov 20, 2012 01:04

Thanks everyone, ALL information posted is helpful and very much appreciated. Looks like this forum is the place to get it right! :grin:
Keep them safe until they all come home.
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Post by Pete » Tue Nov 20, 2012 08:49

In years gone by I have made a lot of venison meat Cabana fresh sausages and added minimal amounts of Cure No 1.

I'm thinking round 1gm cure / 1 kg meat. ( or 1/1000 )

After hanging overnight in the cool room they were vacuum packed and frozen.

After months they cook up a beaut red colour and taste great.

Must do it again but smoke some now I have a smoker and eat them cold.

Comments welcome as to the practice of Cure No 1 in a fresh unsmoked sausage are welcome, no expert here.

Is this a possible answer to your OP krakowska ?

:mrgreen:
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Krakowska
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Post by Krakowska » Tue Nov 20, 2012 10:13

I'm open to all suggestions Pete. Never thought of trying Your suggestion. Ordered some ascorbic acid yesterday. Going to do some experimenting, need at least 2 days in the frig to store. Thanks :smile:
Keep them safe until they all come home.
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Post by ssorllih » Tue Nov 20, 2012 17:49

Drugstore vitamin "C" is abscorbic acid.
Ross- tightwad home cook
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Post by Chuckwagon » Sat Dec 15, 2012 08:08

Topic Split 12.15.12@00:07 by Chuckwagon. See "Safe Thawing Practices" in Technology forum.
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by Smokin Don » Sun Dec 16, 2012 15:20

Just a follow up on what my butcher uses to keep nice color. He said nothing and he uses garlic powder. Looks like you allready have a lot of great info! Smokin Don
I am not aging, just marinating!
http://pelletsmokercooking.blogspot.com/
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redzed
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Post by redzed » Sun Dec 16, 2012 21:12

Smokin Don wrote:Just a follow up on what my butcher uses to keep nice color. He said nothing and he uses garlic powder. Looks like you allready have a lot of great info! Smokin Don
Don, your butcher is a magician! :lol:
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Post by Smokin Don » Mon Dec 17, 2012 23:38

redzed wrote:
Smokin Don wrote:Just a follow up on what my butcher uses to keep nice color. He said nothing and he uses garlic powder. Looks like you allready have a lot of great info! Smokin Don
Don, your butcher is a magician! :lol:
Redzed he really is, he is one reason I haven't really got into sausage making more. Here is a photo of some of his Cajun sausage I jusy bought recently. Don

Image
I am not aging, just marinating!
http://pelletsmokercooking.blogspot.com/
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Post by jscarbo » Fri Mar 07, 2014 14:20

Hi everyone, from one of your newest members living in beautiful San Jose, Costa Rica. I'm just getting started as a sausage maker and am finding a wealth of great info on these forums. Thanks to all for all of your helpful tips. Although I'm a newbie sausage maker, I have over 50 years experience as a cook and a restaurant owner and would like to share some of my experience with using garlic in sausage making or other recipes.

Since I'm new to the forums, I wasn't sure whether to add my post to this old thread or to start a new one. So, moderators, feel free to move it if you think it would be better as a new topic.

There's nothing wrong with using garlic powder or granulated garlic in small quantities when you're trying to add a little garlic flavor to a recipe but if you're making a true garlic sausage (or any recipe where garlic is a predominant flavor), you absolutely have to use fresh garlic. Otherwise, you'll never get a well-balanced garlic flavor and may end up with an off-flavor and a bad aftertaste. The maximum amount of dried garlic I''d consider using in for sausage making is about 1 tablespoon garlic powder or 2 tablespoons of granulated garlic per 5 pound batch or less.

If I want more garlic flavor that that, I'd use fresh garlic or perhaps a combination of the two. Many recipes call for finely diced raw garlic but there can be a problem with bitterness or uneven distribution when you use large amounts of raw garlic. Additionally, there's always some danger of bacterial contamination using raw garlic. This is magnified when you use a lot of it.

The best alternative, in my opinion, is to cook the garlic. Oven-roasted garlic is great and I use it a lot in cooking. It takes about an hour in a 350 degree oven to roast it properly. Usually I roast several heads at once, cutting off the tops and drizzling them with a little olive oil. When cooked, squeeze the garlic pulp out of the husks and mash it into a paste before use. Oven-roasted garlic is milder and sweeter than raw and has its own distinctive, slightly nutty taste which is wonderful in some recipes but not desirable in others.

If I don't want the roasted garlic flavor, my preferred technique is to steam the garlic then make a paste. Steamed garlic is also milder and sweeter than raw but has a different flavor profile than roasted. If substituting roasted or steamed for raw, you may need to use up to twice as much. When I substitute cooked garlic paste for raw garlic, I frequently add a little garlic powder or granulated garlic as well.

There are two steaming techniques I use. They produce similar but not identical results. My preferred method is to place several whole unpeeled heads in a baking dish with a little water, cover it with foil, then steam it in the oven at 325F for about an hour. Allow it to cool, then cut the heads in half and squeeze out the pulp, then mash it into a paste by pushing it through a sieve with a rubber spatula. Unused paste can be stored in the refrigerator for a week or so, or can be frozen for longer storage.

You can also steam garlic on the stovetop if you have a steamer basket or improvise one. It's faster to do it this way and produces similar results. Bring the water to a boil, insert the steamer basket and throw in as many unpeeled whole heads of garlic as you wish. Cover, reduce the heat a bit, then steam it for about 10 or 15 minutes. Test by removing one head and checking to see if it's soft enough to mash easily. Prepare the garlic paste the same way as for oven-steamed.

BTW, as a newbie, I'm concentrating on fresh sausages only at the moment. I've got a lot of experience with other cured and smoked meats but not sausages and don't want to complicate my learning process. So far, I've limited myself to the three types of fresh sausage I use the most: American-style sage breakfast sausage, bratwurst and Italian sausage. I'm still developing my recipes but am pleased with my results so far and am ready to branch out into another type.

I think a good fresh garlic sausage would be a great next sausage to work on. I've found a recipe from Len Poli that looks pretty good but haven't made it yet. Here's the link: http://lpoli.50webs.com/index_files/Garlic-Fresh.pdf . If anyone makes this sausage or has another tried and proven garlic sausage recipe to suggest, I'd love to hear about it. Thanks!
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Shuswap
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Post by Shuswap » Fri Mar 07, 2014 15:57

jscarbo - thanks for the post. Being a novice sausage maker myself, I like any info that will contribute to refining flavor.
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Post by jscarbo » Fri Mar 07, 2014 16:27

You're welcome, Shushwap. Fresh homemade garlic paste, roasted and steamed, are staple ingredients in my cooking which I try to always keep on hand and use several times a week. I usually make both in the oven at the same time in batches of 6 to 8 heads each, refrigerating part and freezing the rest in 2 oz plastic containers.
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redzed
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Post by redzed » Fri Mar 07, 2014 16:30

jscarbo thanks for the garlic prep tips. There are members here that already apply some of those techniques, and one of these days I will as well. My biggest problem these days is sourcing good garlic. In the fall I always get garlic grown by family and friends, but at this time of the year it's impossible to get anything except that flavourless Chinese stuff and old Californis garlic that is beginning to sprout.

The seasoning mix in Poli's fresh garlic sausage looks fine, but as we all know, we have to be careful with the amount of nutmeg. But I do have a problem with the instructions to leave the stuffed sausage out at room temp for several hours. That just does not make sense. On one hand he recommends that the meat be ground partially frozen, and then stuffed and left out at room temp? I am assuming that the intention here is to have all the ingredients "marry" to improve flavour, but that would be better achieved by mixing everything and placing into the fridge for several hours before stuffing. Leaving fresh sausage out for that long invites spoilage and dries and hardens the casings.
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