In learning to control capsicum heat

Post Reply
grasshopper
Passionate
Passionate
Posts: 214
Joined: Wed Feb 22, 2012 21:53
Location: pine city mn

In learning to control capsicum heat

Post by grasshopper » Sun Jun 08, 2014 02:56

In learning to control capsicum heat. Question! which would have more concentration in sausage, cayenne or red pepper flakes. Also what would be the formula for getting the right amount of heat percent wise for mild,moderate and heavy amount. Per pound or kilo. I have ruined some sausage in my humble experience more than once.
sambal badjak
Frequent User
Frequent User
Posts: 167
Joined: Thu Jul 18, 2013 15:41
Location: In the hot Zambezi Valley
Contact:

Post by sambal badjak » Sun Jun 08, 2014 06:50

Difficult one Grasshopper!
The type of pepper (chili) makes a difference, but also the way it was grown.
A pepper that is grown under ideal circumstances (enough fertiliser, water etc) is actually less hot than the same type pepper that went through some stress.

I would suggest test batches every single time
life is too short to drink bad wine (anonymus)
ssorllih
Veteran
Veteran
Posts: 4331
Joined: Sun Feb 27, 2011 19:32
Location: maryland

Post by ssorllih » Sun Jun 08, 2014 14:08

This web site has a comprehensive discussion about paprika and chili. http://gernot-katzers-spice-pages.com/e ... redirect=2
Ross- tightwad home cook
User avatar
Butterbean
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 1774
Joined: Mon Mar 05, 2012 04:10
Location: South Georgia

Post by Butterbean » Sun Jun 08, 2014 16:49

I was talking to a salesman at one of the big food companies about spices a while back and asked him why a certain named brand spice company's spice was so different than what I produce myself. For instance, my chili powder is probably twice as hot as what the sell and I was just wondering why - and why they were so expensive.

His explanation was that they dilute their spices intentionally to a certain degree of heat. This way each batch they make will be the same as the next and to chef's this is consistency is really important.

If I'm using my own spice I will cut the recipe rate in half else it will be way to hot.

I would assume each spice company has its own goals on the heat spices should have so I think it would be wise to find one brand you like and stick with it. Just my thoughts.
User avatar
Bob K
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 2062
Joined: Sun Jun 02, 2013 15:16
Location: Northwest Ct

Post by Bob K » Sun Jun 08, 2014 17:14

TSM list there ground peppers in the rated heat units. 35K, 55K, 90K, ect. They can be used as a guideline but it is still a bit of trial and error.

I myself always err on the side of not too hot on the first run of a recipe, make a small batch, take notes, and adjust accordingly the next time.
User avatar
el Ducko
Veteran
Veteran
Posts: 1340
Joined: Sun Dec 25, 2011 04:59
Location: Texas Hill Country
Contact:

Post by el Ducko » Mon Jun 09, 2014 00:24

Those Scovill units are a useful guideline, but just for ranking different pepper types. Bob's advice is best:small batches, tasting/testing, taking notes.

After all, we're not trying to kill anybody! (...just get their attention!)
:mrgreen:
Experience - the ability to instantly recognize a mistake when you make it again.
grasshopper
Passionate
Passionate
Posts: 214
Joined: Wed Feb 22, 2012 21:53
Location: pine city mn

Post by grasshopper » Mon Jun 09, 2014 03:46

Thanks to all of you. In Marinskys book, salt is to be between 1.5-2% per pound. But with the difference in the scoville of the capsicum. There is no way really to tell. As a beginner that is a tough row to hoe. I will keep making test patty's tell I get it right. There is still melding over night to consider :roll:
Thewitt
Frequent User
Frequent User
Posts: 136
Joined: Sun May 12, 2013 02:24
Location: North Carolina

Post by Thewitt » Sun Aug 10, 2014 03:49

Late to the party here, but test and taste is the only way. We do this between beaches of red pepper flakes as well as they can differ greatly.

Found this out the hard way after mixing 100kg using the recipe for an old batch, and having to double the meat to get back to what we intended!

These two batches were like night and day.
Post Reply