[USA] "Bronsonville Jots"

Blackriver
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[USA] "Bronsonville Jots"

Post by Blackriver » Tue Feb 14, 2012 02:28

I have been looking for a recipe that will give me the flavor of a Johnsville brat. I came across this one.

http://lpoli.50webs.com/index_files/Bra ... consin.pdf

I have never used phosphate, citric acid and sucrose and I don't know where to get them. Could someone tell me what those ingredients are for and if they are nessesary to use? Also if someone else has come across a Johnsonville recipe I would greatly appreciate if they would post it. Thanks
Last edited by Blackriver on Mon Feb 20, 2012 06:50, edited 1 time in total.
partycook
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Post by partycook » Tue Feb 14, 2012 03:17

Hi Blackriver,

With a handle like that you couldn't be from the the black river falls area?

Some of the great places to purchase these products are "the Sausage maker ", Allied Kenco,and Butcher & Packer.

I would like to try to clone there recipe for Italian sausage. Do you have ideas?

JOHN
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Chuckwagon
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Post by Chuckwagon » Tue Feb 14, 2012 03:33

Here you go guys!
"Bronsonville Jots"
This is very close to the "Johnsonville Brat™" recipe.

3.5 lbs. (1600.0 g.) lean pork
1.6 lbs. (750.0 g.) pork fat
7 Tbls. (154.0 g.) corn syrup
5 tspns. (35.0 g.) salt
3 tspns. (13.0 g.) sucrose
2 tspns. (8.0 g.) MSG
2 tspns. (7.0 g.) phosphate
1/2 tspn. (2.0 g.) mustard seeds
3/4 tspn. (1.8 g.) white pepper
1/2 tspn. (1.0 g.) marjoram
1/4 tspn. (1.0 g.) citric acid
1/8 tspn. (0.3 g.) ginger
1/4 cup (60.0 ml) icewater

I can't remember where this recipe came from. It's been in my files through several computers. It may have been from a Len Poli original that was passed around the net several times... (When you get to be over 167 like me, you just can't remember these things. :roll: (Shucks, my horse has a better memory than I do, and he doesn't even recall his own name!) :mrgreen:

Grind all dry spices, salt, and sugar in a spice grinder to a fine powder. Grind the pork and fat separately through a 1/4 plate while it is 32°F. Add the ground spice miture to the meats with the remaining ingredients and mix thoroughly to develop the primary bind. Stuff into casings and twist 5 inch links. Refrigerate brats up to 3 days. Prepare the brats by simmering sliced onions and brats together in beer. Do not boil them! Finish the brats over charcoal fire on a grill.

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by JerBear » Tue Feb 14, 2012 05:09

I got my phosphate from Butcher & Packer. They call it Special Meat Binder and a little bit goes a long way. I'm currently using it at half its maximum.
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Post by Dutch » Tue Feb 14, 2012 17:05

Hey Chuckster-that 7 tablespoons of corn syrup you refer to- is that corn syrup solids or are you talking about something like Karo corn syrup found on the grocery store shelves?

Thanks-
I thought I had a handle on life until one day the handle fell off.
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Post by Chuckwagon » Wed Feb 15, 2012 00:27

Hey Dutch, I like that photo of you in a cowboy hat. You look... uh... dignified! Can you toss a "hoolihan" lassooo?
Yes, in this recipe it is actually corn syrup and it is glucose (dextrose) and only 70% as sweet as sucrose.
In some dry-cured sausages, corn syrup solids support the fermentation process by providing nutrient to lactobacilli or pediococci. In other types, cs "solids" help to maintain the meat's natural color under the harsh neon lights above your supermarket's meat showcase. The chemical formula is the most simple of all sugars and therefore the fastest-acting sugar for lowering pH for combating pathogenic bacteria in fermented sausages.

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by Blackriver » Wed Feb 15, 2012 02:02

Hey John nice to see someone from Wisconsin on the forum! I am actually from the Madison area. The reason for the name "Blackriver" is because the Blackriver Falls area is my favorite place to camp. My wife and I have spent a lot of time in that area.

Hey guys correct me if I am wrong Sucrose is just common table sugar. Chuckwagon, thanks for the recipe and explanation of the corn syrup. I am glad Dutch asked that question because I would have used corn syrup solids not knowing any better.
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Post by Chuckwagon » Wed Feb 15, 2012 05:22

Hi Scott, you wrote:
Hey guys correct me if I am wrong Sucrose is just common table sugar.
Absolutely Blackriver. Oh boy, oh boy... more "Saddlebum Science"! :mrgreen:
Sucrose is common table sugar and made from sugar beets in my area or sugar cane in the south. Sucrose is also called "saccharose" and it is also found in fruit, honey, and even DaveZac`s sugar maple tree sap. Sucrose is half glucose and half fructose. It is sometimes used with glucono delta-lactone for sausages with a medium-fermenting rate as sucrose is the second fastest acting sugar (after dextrose).
Glucose (also called "Dextrose") is sugar refined from corn starch. It is the most simple in make-up of all types of sugar and therefore the most readily used by lactobacilli.
Lactose is sugar from milk. Its makeup is composed from glucose and galactose. The supermarket variety of non-fat dry milk is over 50% lactose and its water binding qualities are high.
Fructose is sugar from fruits and honey. My horse is addicted to this stuff... (in apples).
Maltose is malt sugar made during the fermentation process of germinating barley in the brewing industry. It helps to control the sour flavor produced during the procedure. In sausage making, it is a poor choice for fermentation.
Galactose is closely related to glucose, but it is not nearly as sweet. Galactose is half lactose (milk sugar). In the human body, glucose is changed into galactose to enable the mammary glands to secrete lactose.
Raffinose is the sugar of vegetables and whole grains.
Maltodextrin is sugar produced from rice, potatoes, and corn and is used in the drinking soda industry.

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by jbk101 » Wed Feb 15, 2012 07:06

OK Where does Stevia and other sweeteners (or Sugar Substitutes) fall into the mix of sugar and can they be substituted in Sausage making application? and if yes is there a ratio that can be used?
This is a burning Question for someone with type II diabetes!
John
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Post by Chuckwagon » Wed Feb 15, 2012 07:54

Hi John,
That stuff is too sweet for me. My wife likes it but I don`t care for it because it leaves an aftertaste. Most folks say it`s slower reacting to the tongue and dwindles far too long. It comes from a plant - the stevia rebaudiana from the asteraceae family and its glycosides are three hundred times sweeter than those of glucose. Many cultures around the world have used the leaves for hundreds of years, so it is nothing new to modern man. However, it has virtually no effect on blood sugar, making it very popular with diabetics like you and me.

Stan's new book, "Making Healthy Sausages", covers the modified starches that may be used in sausage. However, because actual sugars play an almost negligible role in sausage making in sausages other than the fermented type, there is really no need to include artificial sweeteners in any sausage. As nutrient for lactobacilli or pediococci, artificial sweeteners would be of no value whatsoever.

Dang good question!
Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by jbk101 » Wed Feb 15, 2012 10:43

Chuckwagon,
I agree that its way too sweet! I haven't tried it anywhere except in my coffee ( I like my Coffee like I like my women "White, Hot, and Sweet" ) and then since I have been using the Stevia and have to cut way back and only use a very small amount to achieve the same sweetness that I like. I had been considering using it as a replacement for brine's and other recipes that calls for sugar but have always been afraid since I do not have a reliable conversion between them and or what the affect would be!
Thanks
John
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Post by Blackriver » Wed Feb 15, 2012 19:20

Could I mix the Karo corn syrup with the water in a blender so I have even distubution thoughout the meat?
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Post by Chuckwagon » Thu Feb 16, 2012 00:08

absolutely!
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Re: [USA] "Bronsonville Jots"

Post by muxmun » Tue Oct 13, 2020 21:29

I have made several brats with pre packaged and other homemade recipes and though they were ok, not quite what I'm looking for. This recipe (see above) calls for phosphate and MSG. Its a Johnsonville knockoff and I guess that's what I'm looking for. So if I left out the phosphate and MSG, would that detract too much from the final out come?? Thanks
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Re: [USA] "Bronsonville Jots"

Post by Bob K » Wed Oct 14, 2020 12:44

No problem with omitting them. The MSG is a flavor enhancer and the phosphates just help to retain more water. Commercially used to prevent shrinkage and profit loss.

I am surprised CW even included them in a recipe
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