Sulphur dioxide in sausage meat?!

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ped
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Sulphur dioxide in sausage meat?!

Post by ped » Sun Dec 07, 2014 18:52

I have just pulled some sausage meat from the freezer that my butcher ground for me, I notice that it has E220 Sulphur Dioxide added as a preservative, this is probably an EU requirement that he has to add it but the question is...do you think it will cause any problems when using it for smoked sausage ?
Devo
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Re: Sulphur dioxide in sausage meat?!

Post by Devo » Sun Dec 07, 2014 19:13

ped wrote:I have just pulled some sausage meat from the freezer that my butcher ground for me, I notice that it has E220 Sulphur Dioxide added as a preservative, this is probably an EU requirement that he has to add it but the question is...do you think it will cause any problems when using it for smoked sausage ?
No it will not. Most big retail places in the US and Canada use it also. It keeps the meat looking fresh.

Origin:
Sulphur is a common element. Sulphur dioxide is produced by burning sulphur. Its use as a preservative is associated with ancient history; it had been widely used in ancient Egypt and the Roman Empire.
Function & characteristics:
It is a colourless gas, used as preservative. It prevents enzymatic and bacterial spoilage of products. Sulphur dioxide dissolves in the aqueous phase of the product; the acid resulting from this reaction is the active agent. It is thus most effective in acid and slightly acid foods. It is ineffective at neutral pH.
It also acts as an oxidizing agent, with bleaching effects. It is thus used as a bleaching agent in flour; however, it oxidises (natural) colours in foods, which restricts its usage.
Finally, it stabilises vitamin C in products and prevents discoloration of white wine.
Heating removes sulphur dioxide as gas from products.
Products:
Sulphur dioxide may be used in a very broad range of acidic products.
Acceptable Daily Intake:
Up to 0.7 mg/kg body weight.
Side effects:
Due to its oxidising effect, it may reduce the vitamin content in products. It is reduced in the liver to harmless sulphate and excreted in the urine. It can, however, cause breathing problems in asthmatic patients. In high concentrations (above those normally used in foods) it can cause gastrointestinal disturbances in some people.
Dietary restrictions:
None - sulphur dioxide and sulphites can be consumed by all religious groups, vegans and vegetarians.
ped
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Post by ped » Sun Dec 07, 2014 19:19

Thanks Devo, so no problems mixing with cure#1 then?
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Post by Devo » Sun Dec 07, 2014 19:27

No there is no problem at all. The most common reason it is added to meat (ground meat) is to stop it from looking brown over time. It is much more appealing if we as consumers see the red meat we are used to when shopping.
ped
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Post by ped » Sun Dec 07, 2014 19:32

Ok thanks
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Post by ssorllih » Sun Dec 07, 2014 22:20

In some places we can still buy sulfur candles for use in all of the above products. Used extensively for dried apples.
Ross- tightwad home cook
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