Is this mold ok?

reddal
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Is this mold ok?

Post by reddal » Sun Mar 26, 2017 11:07

Hi,

My recent batch of chorizo used Mold 600 solution for the first time. This seemed to be going well with a consistent covering of white mold after a few days. However a week after fermentation I noticed some gray/green dots on the chorizo - which dont look good :

Image

Closeup :
Image

The chamber is at 14c and 82.5% humidity. Any advice on this mold? Should I clean them with vinegar and reapply mold solution?

thanks - reddal
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Bob K
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Post by Bob K » Sun Mar 26, 2017 12:47

Really nothing to be concerned about. You could drop the temp to 12 and the humidity to 80 to slow down the mold growth.
Slime, especially black is your enemy not molds on meat.

More info here:

http://wedlinydomowe.pl/en/viewtopic.ph ... sc&start=0

http://www.wedlinydomowe.pl/en/viewtopic.php?t=7880
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redzed
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Post by redzed » Sun Mar 26, 2017 15:59

Kind of odd that the spots appeared after the nalgiovense established itself so well. I can't really see your spots in a higher resolution, but as long as you don't get the black mould which tends to sink roots into the meat, you have nothing to worry about.
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Post by reddal » Sun Mar 26, 2017 19:12

redzed wrote:Kind of odd that the spots appeared after the nalgiovense established itself so well. I can't really see your spots in a higher resolution, but as long as you don't get the black mould which tends to sink roots into the meat, you have nothing to worry about.
My current theory is that I introduced the new mold into the chamber when I opened the door occasionally. The small dehumidifier in the chamber was struggling a bit to keep the humidity down - so I was opening the door for a minute or so every now and then which dropped the humidity quickly. The chamber is in a garage so not exactly a clean environment - but I didn't think allowing some air in would cause an issue? Don't some people have fans to constantly circulate air from outside in fact? Do I need to move the whole thing to a 'clean room' and put on a space suit every time I go near it :) ?.

I hope you are right that this new mold won't be a problem... Making fermented sausage is hard!

thanks for your help - reddal
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Post by reddal » Thu May 04, 2017 15:32

Hi,

Just to close this off - the mold didn't get any worse. I cleaned it off some of them and left some as they were. Both seem to be fine now they are are ready and are tasting very good.

Thanks for all your help. Here is what the final product looked like :

Image

- reddal
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Butterbean
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Post by Butterbean » Thu May 04, 2017 16:26

In my view as long as its not slime you are fine.
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Post by BriCan » Fri May 05, 2017 10:18

redzed wrote:but as long as you don't get the black mould which tends to sink roots into the meat, you have nothing to worry about.
All colours of moulds are fine even the black and yes they (black) have tentacles which just penetrate the surface of the meat, but if casings are used then there is no penetration

Humidity needs to be dropped down to 75%
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How about these spots?

Post by SMR » Mon Jan 15, 2018 23:22

These spots appeared halfway through the 48 hour fermentation period of Stanley Marianski's Soppresetta recipe. I used T-SPX even though no culture is called for in his recipe. Fermented at 68 F and 80-90% humidity. Mold 600 was applied midway and is now starting to grow. Spots are below the casing surface on the surface of the meat and feel hard to the touch. Not sure if this is mold, swollen peppercorns or worse. Casing is dry and not slimy and is now drying at 56 F and 78% humidity (76 to 80 range).

https://imageshack.com/i/pnGA6YEUj

https://imageshack.com/i/poYheJDyj

Does anybody recognize these spots?

Thanks
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Bob K
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Post by Bob K » Mon Jan 15, 2018 23:48

No problem! those are peppercorns or pepper/ spice pieces. Since you used a culture did you adjust the sugars?

Mold is aerobic and won't grow under the casing unless there are air pockets :smile:

https://www.meatsandsausages.com/sausag ... oppressata
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redzed
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Post by redzed » Mon Jan 15, 2018 23:50

Hey SMR, welcome to the forum! Great to have you aboard! If the spots are under the casing and you can't scrape anything off the surface then its almost certainly peppercorns and you have nothing to worry about. If you used this recipe https://www.meatsandsausages.com/sausag ... oppressata and added 10g/kg dextrose, then fermented it with TSPX, prepare to pucker your lips when you taste it for the first time. :lol: :lol:

edit: That danged Bob has faster keying fingers than me! :shock:
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Post by SMR » Tue Jan 16, 2018 00:27

Wow! Thanks for the speedy replies. The tandem peppercorn response is relieving. It did not occur to me that I would need to adjust the dextrose. In The Art of Making Fermented Sausage, the ideal is between .1 and .3 % sugar for slow fermented sausage. I didn't think this would change just because I was relying on a starter culture instead of a "chance" culture. But now that you mention it, Marianski's recipe from the green book has 10 g/1000 g or 1%..I have no idea why he would propose that since Soppresetta is a slow fermented sausage.

I think you are right, I'd better start puckering!
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Post by Kijek » Tue Jan 16, 2018 01:36

Reddal mentioned about the opening the chamber door every now then, is that the wrong thing to do?

Do you want outside air to circulate in?
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Post by Bob K » Tue Jan 16, 2018 02:42

Reddal mentioned about the opening the chamber door every now then, is that the wrong thing to do?
No
Kijek wrote:Do you want outside air to circulate in?
Yes
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Post by Kijek » Tue Jan 16, 2018 02:51

I learn something new everyday in here.
Once again Bob K to the rescue, I think we need to change your name to "Professor" :lol:
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Post by Bob K » Tue Jan 16, 2018 02:56

If you don't own the book The Art of Making Fermented Sausages... I highly recommend it
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