Question about Coppa

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Question about Coppa

Post by Devo » Thu May 17, 2012 22:58

The Copa recipe in Ruhlman, Michael; Polcyn, Brian (2011-09-15). Charcuterie: The Craft of Salting, Smoking, and Curing has it either sweet or spicy. Now if I want to make the spicy do I just add the two together? Or is it two separate recipes?
Spicy:
Hot paprika, preferably Hungarian to coat the meat (about 4 tablespoons/32 grams) 1 tablespoon/9 grams cayenne pepper

FOR SWEET SAUSAGE:
3 tablespoons/40 grams sugar 2 tablespoons/20 grams freshly ground black pepper 1 tablespoon/8 grams ground coriander 2 teaspoons/12 grams minced garlic 1 teaspoon/4 grams ground mace 1 teaspoon/4 grams ground allspice 33/44 teaspoon/3 grams ground juniper berries
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Post by Baconologist » Thu May 17, 2012 23:51

It's 2 separate recipes, each to be used with the dry cure.

That recipe(s) has received a lot of criticism because real coppa isn't made with chunks.
Godspeed!

Bob
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Post by Cabonaia » Fri May 18, 2012 01:59

I made that recipe and was not impressed - would not make it again.
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Post by Devo » Fri May 18, 2012 02:46

Thanks guys
I really didn't have the right cut of meat for whole Coppa so I was looking at the chunks recipe. I guess it's time to get creative and see what comes of it. I have been known to pull a rabbit from a hat from time to time. Might just end up with some Coppa Head cheese :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:
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Post by Cabonaia » Fri May 18, 2012 04:00

Coppa Cabeza! Good luck with it! Maybe I just made mine wrong....

So now that I've criticized the coppa recipe, I should mention that the Tuscan salami recipe from the same book turned out great.
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Post by Butterbean » Fri May 18, 2012 04:14

If you decide to make the "imitation" with the chunks I have a very good recipe if you'd like it. Its much easier and much more forgiving.

Here is the real - on left.

Image

"Imitation"

Image
Last edited by Butterbean on Fri May 18, 2012 04:20, edited 1 time in total.
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Post by Devo » Fri May 18, 2012 04:15

Cabonaia
I do appreciate you views on the recipe. I am by far not very experienced with this dry curing stuff and need all the help I can get. I read everything I can get my hands on, every blog that I find and bookmark everything that seems to have worked for someone. I do have a few ideas for this and I will let everyone know how it turns out. Hmmmm now how do I make that sausage press floating around in my brain.
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Post by Devo » Fri May 18, 2012 04:44

Butterbean wrote:If you decide to make the "imitation" with the chunks I have a very good recipe if you'd like it. Its much easier and much more forgiving.

Here is the real - on left.

Image

"Imitation"

Image
As far as appearance yes they look different but as far as taste wise how did it compare.
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Post by Cabonaia » Fri May 18, 2012 05:03

Hey, I'm a beginner too. Don't ask me about that mushy soprasatta.... :mrgreen:

Am also reading my brains out and bookmarking away. Getting a free fridge this weekend and have got the remaining parts on order for turning it into a curing chamber. Not to mention building a pig pen. This sausage making addiction is deep and wide!

Now Butterbean...look at those salamis in his picture. He is an artist!

What I like about this forum is that in spite of the fact that I have veered into something that nobody I remotely know has any experience in, I can get all the advice, inspiration -- and warning -- I need, often in minutes.
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Post by Chuckwagon » Fri May 18, 2012 07:33

What I like about this forum is that in spite of the fact that I have veered into something that nobody I remotely know has any experience in, I can get all the advice, inspiration -- and warning -- I need, often in minutes.
Jeff, we have two of the finest "air-dried" sausage makers I`ve ever known, right here on our site. Both these guys are gentlemen - too modest to "blow their own horns", but as professional as any artist-craftsmen in this field. Uwanna in Vermont, and Butterbean in Georgia just seem to have the knack for making this type of sausage and their comments and help are always appreciated. These two guys help others and share their knowledge - surely a mark of credibility.
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by Butterbean » Fri May 18, 2012 14:35

Devo wrote:
Butterbean wrote:If you decide to make the "imitation" with the chunks I have a very good recipe if you'd like it. Its much easier and much more forgiving.

Here is the real - on left.

Image

"Imitation"

Image
As far as appearance yes they look different but as far as taste wise how did it compare.
Both are delicious and I don't think the average person would notice the difference. The "real" one has a more subtle taste profile and has that unique taste and tang that only aging will give. The "imitation" is a bit stronger from a spice standpoint since some of the spices that would only be on the outside of the meat get worked inside the meat when stuffed. Personally, I like both but from a time standpoint, I'll make more of the imitation type.
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Post by IdaKraut » Fri May 18, 2012 14:49

Butterbean wrote:If you decide to make the "imitation" with the chunks I have a very good recipe if you'd like it. Its much easier and much more forgiving.

Butterbean, I would love to try your recipe for the "imitation" version. Thank you.
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Post by Butterbean » Fri May 18, 2012 14:55

Alright, I'll post it as soon as I dig it up.

Edit: Here is a link to an e-book with the recipe.

http://www.deejayssmokepit.net/Download ... llaHam.pdf
Last edited by Butterbean on Fri May 18, 2012 15:20, edited 1 time in total.
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Post by story28 » Fri May 18, 2012 15:10

Baconologist wrote: That recipe(s) has received a lot of criticism because real coppa isn't made with chunks.
Some real coppa comes from chunks of meat. The coppa most Americans are familiar with is Coppa di Piacenza - which consists of the whole neck muscle.

However, Umbrian coppa is made from head meat and that is cut into chunks. It isn't too well known, although it is also called coppa di testa - which is more familiar of a name.

Here is a rough example: http://images.search.yahoo.com/images/v ... XnGplIxwI0

Chef Brian's coppa, perhaps should be called coppa di Milford (where he lives). :smile:
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Post by crustyo44 » Sat May 19, 2012 20:53

Hi Butterbean,
Thank you for the link. Looking at the recipe, I am not sure if I can get "Amesphos" here,
can I leave it out? or is there a substitute?
Best Regards,
Jan.
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