Ross's Maryland Bakery

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Post by ssorllih » Thu Aug 22, 2013 01:42

Thanks to both of you. This thread has had about 220 replies but nearly 7000 views. It would be so fine to have some of the people that look in frequently let us know if they have been inspired to make some bread to go with their sausage.
A good rustic bread and a good soup can feed a family for rather small change.
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Post by ssorllih » Sat Aug 24, 2013 14:52

Trying a new bread recipe today. I have the dough mixed and ready for the first kneading. Details as they become available.
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A new recipe

Post by ssorllih » Sat Aug 24, 2013 21:07

This is completely new to me having not heard of this method before.
I would never have thought of it except perhaps in desperation.
First cook one ounce of flour in 4 ounces of water until the flour thickens. This is the way we used to make wall paper paste. It will stick and burn in a heartbeat. Let that cool.
weigh out 17 ounces of All purpose flour
a heaping tablespoon of sugar
a rounded teaspoon of salt
a scant teaspoon of dry yeast
4 ounces of milk
5 ounces of water
three tablespoons of melted fat

The cooked flour and water paste is called for this method a roux after a Japanese method of bread making.
Combine the roux the water and the milk with the yeast and sugar and mix it into the flour, when it makes a dough, add the fat and the salt and mix/knead that for a few minutes. Allow everything to rest for a half hour and knead it a little more. Then dust it with flour and coax it into a neat ball and pour a teaspoon of melted fat around it and turn the ball to coat it and then cover it for about three hours. Then you can dump it out to shape it. This dough is soft and tender and is best treated with a light hand. I believe that it will make a good burger bun from the shape of the little loaves that I made.
After shaping allow them to rise for an hour and bake at 375°F for about 25 minutes. Image Image Image Image Image Image
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Commntary from the critics

Post by ssorllih » Sat Aug 24, 2013 21:12

The new recipe is pleasing but not what I expect from homemade bread. Nancy says that it reminds her of Wonderbread. The crust is soft and the crumb is not at all tough. I would not use bread flour to make it the original recipe called for pastry flour and bread flour. When next I make it I will shape burger buns. Should get 10 to 12 from the batch.
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Post by Krakowska » Sat Aug 24, 2013 21:27

Looks good to me Ross, thanks for the pics. By the way I used a recipe form the first couple of pages and THAT is the recipe I will use from now on when we make our pizzas. Been making pizza for years and FINALLY got the dough right with Your recipe. Thank You Sir, Fred :cool:
Keep them safe until they all come home.
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Post by ssorllih » Sat Aug 24, 2013 21:57

Fred, Bread can be so simple and so hard to get just right for a purpose. The best thing I have learned is working by bakers percentages. Even if I get it wrong I can at least duplicate the mistake.
I still have the convert this recipe to percentages.
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Post by Chuckwagon » Sun Aug 25, 2013 00:17

Nancy says that it reminds her of Wonderbread.
Yeah, but "Wonderbread helps build strong bodies TWELVE different ways!" :shock:
Ross, ol' buddy... the texture looks wonderful! and the loaves are a beautiful color. I can imagine that stuff makes a great bun for a hot sausage like a brat or weiner eh? :wink:
Thanks for sharing.

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
Last edited by Chuckwagon on Sun Aug 25, 2013 02:05, edited 1 time in total.
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Old School NY Jewish Deli Rye

Post by Bob K » Sun Aug 25, 2013 00:23

Ingredients

First Clear Flour 1lb 454gr 100 %

Instant Yeast 1 1/2 tsp

Water 8oz 237gr 52%

Salt 1 1/4 tsp 7gr 1.5%

Rye Sour 1 cup 230 gr 51%

Caraway Seeds 1 heaping tablespoon (to taste)

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Place all ingredients in the bowl of a stand mixer. Or Bowl
Knead the dough with the dough hook (or by hand) at Speed 2 until the gluten is well-developed. About 10 minutes. Scrape dough onto lightly floured board and hand knead very briefly. Form into a ball.

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Lightly oil a bowl or use a banneton (basket)


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Place the loave onto bowl or basket.
Let the loave rise until doubled in size (or 90% doubled).

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An hour before baking, place a pizza stone on the middle rack of the oven and a cast iron skillet on the bottom rack. Heat the oven to 450F.



When loave has doubled in size, place on parchment , score them with 3 slashes across the long axis of the loaves and slide them, still on the parchment, onto the pizza stone. Pour 1/2 cup boiling water into the skillet, and close the oven door.

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If the bread seems to be getting dark too fast, turn down the oven to 440F

Continue baking until the loaves are done. The crust is well browned and the bottom sounds hollow when tapped. This was a total of about 25 minutes.

Cool on a wire rack before slicing.

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While the loaf is cooling, brush with cornstarch solution. (Whisk 4 tsp cornstarch in 1/4 cup of water. Pour this slowly into 1 cup of slowly boiling water, whisking constantly. When the solution is somewhat thickened, take off the fire. It can be used while still hot.

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More to come on Rye sour (Sourdough) and sourdough cultures
Last edited by Bob K on Sun Aug 25, 2013 01:22, edited 2 times in total.
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Post by ssorllih » Sun Aug 25, 2013 00:42

BobK, I think that the key ingredient here is the Rye Sour. Could you describe that for us please? Your loaf looks grand.
Is the starch simply a glaze for the finished loaf?
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Post by Bob K » Sun Aug 25, 2013 01:35

Yes Ross the cornstarch is an (optional) glaze.

I some how lost the all important ryesour info that I had typed...I will redo and repost.
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Post by Krakowska » Sun Aug 25, 2013 16:43

Can't wait until You update Bob K. My next project when I find some First Clear Flour. Never tried rye bread before but sure love it growing up in Buffalo there were :cool: dozens of local bakeries making their own rye breads. Thanks so much for Your time, effort and the pictures are a 1000 words. Much appreciated, Fred :cool:
Keep them safe until they all come home.
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Another comment on the new bread recipe

Post by ssorllih » Sun Aug 25, 2013 18:05

We had poached eggs on toast for brunch and for the toast I sliced a half of a new loaf horizontally. Toasted it light brown and buttered it and topped it with two eggs. The toast is only just okay for this and there are other breads that work better for my taste. We have some pulled pork BBQ that we will try this pm. More later.
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Post by sawhorseray » Sun Aug 25, 2013 18:21

What a master, I thought the "wonderbread" looked fantastic, perfect for a nice webbered sausage. I've had good luck making rye bread with my machine before, that thing still comes in pretty handy now and then. RAY
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Post by ssorllih » Sun Aug 25, 2013 18:25

I came upon a machine recipe for this mix and I will try to find the link for you.
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Rye sour...and other stuff

Post by Bob K » Sun Aug 25, 2013 18:42

First you need to have a sourdough starter. Yes you can make them from scratch but....this is a lot easier. Purchase a culture and build a starter, These folks have quite a variety http://www.sourdo.com/ And great instructions http://www.sourdo.com/activation-instru ... s-english/

And I started with the Italian cultures as I originally purchased to make pizza dough.

Once you have a starter it will last for years....just don`t use chlorinated water



So, assuming you have a healthy wheat-based sourdough starter:

1. Put 50 gms (just pour some in) or so of your SD starter in a clean bowl.

2. Add 1/2 cup of water and mix thoroughly.

3. Measure 1 cup of rye flour. Add and mix thoroughly. You should have a soupy gray paste
.
4.. Cover the bowl tightly and let the sour ferment
This may take anywhere from 4-12 hours, depending on how vigorous your SD starter is.

You now should have a goodly quantity of active rye sour, ready to use to make breads.

At this point I keep about 1 cup in a mason jar, stored in the fridge.

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The night before I make Rye bread I add 1/2 cup water and 1 cup White Rye flour to the jar and let ferment over night.

Then use in Recipe posted above



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Some other sources that I have used:

First Clear and White Rye flour : http://nybakers.com/index.php

You can substitute high gluten flour for first clear but...It just ain`t the same!!!

The great thing about this bread is that it stays "Fresh" for several days.

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