Christmas Terrines

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Scogar
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Christmas Terrines

Post by Scogar » Sat Dec 26, 2020 15:45

I made two terrines, one a liver mousse and the other a pork pistachio terrine. Both were recipes from Olympia Provisions cookbook. The former used all venison liver instead of the specified pork liver. I have to say I don't really like it all that much. I'm not certain its the liver so much as its the interaction of the liver with the port wine. As a spread I think it is ok when combined with mustard or pickle but stand alone on a cracker there is just something a little offputting. I do like braunschweiger and straight up venison liver so I am confused. But the pork pistachio pate is really good.

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One thing I now believe about terrines is I'm not sure they are worth the effort. I mean you grind the meats and you cure them then place them in a loaf pan and cook as a bain marie until its done. Then press, cool, slice and eat. Why not put it all in a casing, give yourself the option to smoke and sous vide. You'd get the same thing in a more convenient carrying case. As I ponder this I think making a complex layered terrine or a terrine with a central core of something different does actually make sense. Maybe the casing is substitiuted for a terrine when the force meat is just a homogenous mixture. Oh well more things to explore I guess
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Albertaed
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Re: Christmas Terrines

Post by Albertaed » Sat Dec 26, 2020 16:24

I enjoy making a terrine from time to time. I’ve made the one on the left with pork/chicken liver and I enjoyed it. I have been eyeing up doing the other as well. Any way they look great
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redzed
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Re: Christmas Terrines

Post by redzed » Sun Dec 27, 2020 19:59

Terrines are a lot of work and not everyone likes them. They are certainly not as popular in North America as the they are in Europe. When you enter a charcuterie shop in France, even a small village, you are amazed at the selection and variety of terrines behind the counter. I think you have to taste a whole bunch of them to decide which ones you like. I have the Ruhlman and Polcyn book Pâté, Confit, Rillette: Recipes from the Craft of Charcuterie, that one of our forum members sent me as a gift, but so far have only made two items from that book. I have to practice a bit more with that branch of charcuterie. Still a few months of winter left, and I can't go anywhere, so it's a good time as any to get into it.
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