[USA] Chorizo (Mexican style)

User avatar
Chuckwagon
Veteran
Veteran
Posts: 4494
Joined: Tue Apr 06, 2010 04:51
Location: Rocky Mountains

Post by Chuckwagon » Sun Sep 15, 2013 11:47

Topic Split by CW - 091513@0440
See: "Chorizo With Hot Peppers" at this link: http://wedlinydomowe.pl/en/viewtopic.php?t=6749
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
User avatar
el Ducko
Veteran
Veteran
Posts: 1340
Joined: Sun Dec 25, 2011 04:59
Location: Texas Hill Country
Contact:

Post by el Ducko » Sun Sep 15, 2013 14:55

Hey Patito those are great selfies! But should not they be in the Post Your Photo Here-Let's Become Acquainted thread?
Yeah. Prolly.
...or maybe the "Welcome Overboard" thread.
:mrgreen:
Experience - the ability to instantly recognize a mistake when you make it again.
User avatar
el Ducko
Veteran
Veteran
Posts: 1340
Joined: Sun Dec 25, 2011 04:59
Location: Texas Hill Country
Contact:

EFF-OH-BEE

Post by el Ducko » Thu Dec 26, 2013 15:09

It is traditional in Colombia for the Father of the bride to eat...

Well, I don`t know what, but when my daughter gets married next year in Colombia, I intend to enjoy some of the local chorizos. Looks like I have found an authentic recipe: "Secrets of Colombian Cooking, Expanded Edition" by Patricia McCausland-Gallo, Hippocrene Books, © 2014, page 61.

The peppers, which have been so troublesome to find here in North America, are now available in supermarkets, called "sweet green and red peppers." They are quite good in salads, where they taste much like the familiar red or green bell pepper. (That`s what you should substitute if you can`t find `em in your local food market.)

The achiote (annatto) seeds are another story. They just about can`t be found unless you go to a tienda (shop) which sells Hispanic foods. Usually I buy achiote molido (ground annatto) because the seeds are extremely hard. ...harder than your grinder`s blades! But you can always use ground annatto instead of the whole seed kind. Strain the oil through a coffee filter.

Enjoy your red coffee and read on!
Duk
:mrgreen:

[Colombia] Chorizo
● 1 lb finely diced pork
● 1/4 lb finely diced pork belly or bacon
● 1/2 cup minced chard
● 1/2 cup minced aji dulce (small sweet green peppers)
● 1/2 cup minced scallion
● 1 Tbsp minced garlic
● 2-1/2 tsp salt
● 3/4 tsp black pepper
● 5 Tbsp oil
● 2 Tbsp achiote seeds

Out of respect to the author, I`ve listed the ingredients as described. You and I would, instead, chill the pork and pork belly almost to freezing, then coarse-grind 'em. Probably you should mince the veggies by hand to get an authentic texture. Place `em all (everything except the oil and achiote (annatto) seeds in a nonreactive bowl and mix.

In a small pot over low heat, cook the oil and achiote for 3 to 5 minutes, until the oil turns very red. Strain the oil into the mixture in the bowl, and discard the leftover seeds. (These little guys are extremely hard, so you don`t want to bite down on one.) Mix everything in the bowl, cover, and refrigerate overnight.

Next day, stuff hog casing, making four-inch links. Refrigerate uncovered for 2 days.
Cook over charcoal or fry in a pan in its own oil until fully cooked, about five to seven minutes. (Like most fresh sausage, you can alternatively freeze and cook later.)
Experience - the ability to instantly recognize a mistake when you make it again.
User avatar
redzed
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 3631
Joined: Fri Apr 20, 2012 06:29
Location: Vancouver Island

Post by redzed » Thu Dec 26, 2013 20:29

Interesting recipe Ducko! But rather than giving it a go at this time, I hope to sample Colombian chorizos when we get there. We leave for Colombia in a couple of weeks. So if you have suggestions for "must try" chorizos or other dishes, please share.
User avatar
el Ducko
Veteran
Veteran
Posts: 1340
Joined: Sun Dec 25, 2011 04:59
Location: Texas Hill Country
Contact:

Post by el Ducko » Fri Dec 27, 2013 00:19

redzed wrote:...So if you have suggestions for "must try" chorizos or other dishes, please share.
Step 1 Try everything.
Step 2 Enjoy!
Step 3 Report it here.
Step 4 Bring back some for your friendly local herd-o-ducks. (I'll be first in line!)
:mrgreen:
Experience - the ability to instantly recognize a mistake when you make it again.
Thewitt
Frequent User
Frequent User
Posts: 136
Joined: Sun May 12, 2013 02:24
Location: North Carolina

Post by Thewitt » Fri Dec 27, 2013 01:52

One caution on making annatto oil. If you cook the seeds too long or too hot they will turn black and the oil will be very bitter. Not the taste or color you are after. I usually bring the oil up to temp with the seeds in it then turn it off and just let them steep.

We make about a gallon a week for longganisas
Darwin
User
User
Posts: 64
Joined: Mon Aug 11, 2014 05:07
Location: us

Re: [USA] Chorizo (Mexican style)

Post by Darwin » Sun Sep 21, 2014 04:44

el Ducko wrote:For those of you who, like me, enjoy scrambled eggs with chorizo for breakfast but are appalled at the amount of fat in commercial products, here's a good Mexican-style chorizo. It's a fresh sausage. However, it's good smoked. (Make sure to add the optional cure if you smoke it.) Here's the recipe for a small batch (2 lbs.):

Chorizo (Mexican style)
2 lbs. pork (fat trimmings removed)
1/2 lb. pork trimmings
12 gm non-iodized salt
3.1 gm cure #1 (optional, mandatory if sausage is to be smoked)
0.75 gm pepper (black)
20 gm garlic (6 medium cloves - fresh) *(Edited by CW 2.22.12 by author's request)
24 gm chile- ancho (remove stems & seeds, grind)
13 gm chile-pasillo (remove stems & seeds, grind)
0.2 gm cloves (ground)
0.7 gm coriander (ground)
0.4 gm cumin (ground)
0.4 gm oregano
7.8 gm paprika (sweet)
100 ml vinegar
...

!Buen provecho!
Muchas gracias, Señor Pato! I really like the spice profile of Mexican chorizo, but not real fond of the protein they usually use.
User avatar
el Ducko
Veteran
Veteran
Posts: 1340
Joined: Sun Dec 25, 2011 04:59
Location: Texas Hill Country
Contact:

Re: [USA] Chorizo (Mexican style)

Post by el Ducko » Sun Sep 21, 2014 14:05

Darwin wrote:...but not real fond of the protein they usually use.
Yup! Sometimes ya don't wanna know. ...but when you DO, it's a good idea to make yer own.
Duk
:mrgreen:
Experience - the ability to instantly recognize a mistake when you make it again.
Post Reply